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Patient-Centered Care

From the National Academy of Medicine’s 2001 Crossing the Quality Chasm report to the more recent Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis, patient-centered care is recognized as integral to high-quality care.1,2  Defined as “care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions,”patient-centered care delivery strives to treat the “whole” patient throughout the cancer care continuum.3  The importance of placing the patient at the center of care processes is reflected by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer, Cancer Program Standards: Ensuring Patient-Centered Care.4 Today many cancer programs continue to expand patient access to a variety of psychosocial and supportive care services. In this section, find ACCC programs, tools, articles, and a curated hub of supportive care resources to help.

1Institute of Medicine. Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century. 2001.
2Institute of Medicine. Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis. 2013.
3Institute of Medicine. Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs. 2008.
4American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer. Cancer Program Standards: Ensuring Patient-Centered Care. 2016.  

Featured Programs

Shared Decision-Making

Shared Decision-Making: Practical Implementation for the Oncology Team seeks to highlight effective strategies in patient-provider communication, particularly through shared decision-making in relation to specific patient populations, such as those with metastatic disease, low literacy, and advanced old age, in which principles for effective communication differ vastly.
Learn More

Supportive Care Resources Hub

The Supportive Care Resources Hub offers a host of curated resources for providers in the areas of psychosocial distress screening, survivorship care planning, patient navigation, palliative care, and communication. 
Learn More

ACCCBuzz Blog Posts

From Oncology Issues

  •  The In-Betweeners: A Focus on Young Adults with Cancer
    Kristin S. Donahue, MSN, RN, OCN, et al.
    Our team of young adult administrators quietly agreed that we were not doing all that we could for our young adult cancer patients. This session was our call to action. When we returned to our program, our team pledged do more for this often forgotten about patient population—the In-Betweeners.
  •  Guided Patient Support: Helping Patients Navigate the Clinical, Psychosocial, and Financial Aspects of Cancer Care
    Jessica Sima, MSN, RN, ACM, et al.
    This innovative program provides coordinated whole-person care, ensuring that patients receive the support they need through psychosocial counseling, social support, rehabilitation services, financial counseling, nurse navigation, nutritional intervention, transportation assistance, physical therapy, tertiary care referrals, and medication assistance. The GPS approach helps the cancer care team proactively identify patient needs and prepare patients for treatment.
  •  Supporting Cancer Survivors in Making Healthful Lifestyle Changes
    Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, PhD, RD, et al.
    Evidence-based diet and exercise interventions and programs that can improve cancer survivors’ quality of life and physical and mental health.
  •  Impact of a Community-Based Cancer Survivorship Program on Quality of Life
    Rrachel Funk-Lawler, PhD, et al.
    Despite the demonstrated need to implement evidence-based interventions that address the psychosocial and behavioral concerns of cancer survivors, few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of community-based survivorship programs. To address this need, the Fort Worth Program for Community Survivorship—a community-based cancer survivorship program at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Moncrief Cancer Institute in Fort Worth, Tex.—conducted a study involving more than 200 post treatment cancer survivors to evaluate the effectiveness of the program’s services.
  •  Can You Hear Me Now?
    Kimberly Smith, MPHA
    After integrating voice recognition software with its EMR, Mount Sinai Health System reduced physician workload, improved patient care, and streamlined clinic workflow. Physicians and staff shared that this process improvement initiative also improved their well-being, freeing clinicians up to spend more time doing what they want to do—caring for patients.