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Patient-Centered Care

From the National Academy of Medicine’s 2001 Crossing the Quality Chasm report to the more recent Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis, patient-centered care is recognized as integral to high-quality care.1,2  Defined as “care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions,” patient-centered care delivery strives to treat the “whole” patient throughout the cancer care continuum.3  The importance of placing the patient at the center of care processes is reflected by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer, Cancer Program Standards: Ensuring Patient-Centered Care.4 Today many cancer programs continue to expand patient access to a variety of psychosocial and supportive care services. In this section, find ACCC programs, tools, articles, and a curated hub of supportive care resources to help.

1Institute of Medicine. Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century. 2001.
2Institute of Medicine. Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis. 2013.
3Institute of Medicine. Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs. 2008.
4American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer. Cancer Program Standards: Ensuring Patient-Centered Care. 2016.  

Featured Programs

Supportive Care Resources Hub

The Supportive Care Resources Hub offers a host of curated resources for providers in the areas of psychosocial distress screening, survivorship care planning, patient navigation, palliative care, and communication. 
Learn More

ACCCBuzz Blog Posts

From Oncology Issues

  • Cancer Crushing Prevention and Early Detection
    By Chuck DeGooyer
    In looking at cancer incidence data, Tri-Cities Cancer Center found that its region was experiencing a higher rate of late-stage lung and colorectal diagnoses than the national average. The cancer center developed a creative and humorous marketing campaign and workplace wellness program to raise awareness and increase screening compliance.
  • The Oncology Pharmacy Navigator
    By Kelly Rice, PharmD
    Patients with cancer experience a variety of difficulties in accessing and managing their medications. The Legacy Health Cancer Institute established an oncology pharmacy navigator to decrease barriers to patient access, reconcile medication lists, and alleviate the financial burden of cancer care.
  • Improving Care of Advanced Cancer Patients with a Dedicated Palliative Radiotherapy Team
    By Kavita Dharmarajan, MD, MSc
    Due to radiation oncology’s focus on disease, palliative radiation therapy often involves lengthier courses than necessary and extended wait times, posing financial and logistical challenges for patients. Mount Sinai Hospital’s Department of Radiation Oncology and the Tisch Cancer Institute established a specialized service model to increase the use of short-course radiation treatments, reduce the lengths of hospital stay, and improve access to palliative care services.
  • Views: A Patient's Best Friend
    By Julie Bulger
    The benefits of a formal pet therapy program are obvious—it defines personalized care. Animal visits bring joy to patients during some of their most difficult days, enhancing social and emotional well-being and relieving stress. And though it’s all about the patient at Vanderbilt, it’s not just patients who benefit.
  • Views: The Breast Cancer School for Patients
    John Williams, MD
    Most healthcare facilities provide information online and offer handouts to patients at their facilities. I suggest that cancer programs, professional organizations, and physicians should pivot toward “teaching” patients how to obtain quality, cutting-edge care in their own communities. Specifically, our profession should engage patients with sophisticated video-based patient education. That is why I created the Breast Cancer School for Patients.