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Patient-Centered Care

From the National Academy of Medicine’s 2001 Crossing the Quality Chasm report to the more recent Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis, patient-centered care is recognized as integral to high-quality care.1,2  Defined as “care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions,”patient-centered care delivery strives to treat the “whole” patient throughout the cancer care continuum.3  The importance of placing the patient at the center of care processes is reflected by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer, Cancer Program Standards: Ensuring Patient-Centered Care.4 Today many cancer programs continue to expand patient access to a variety of psychosocial and supportive care services. In this section, find ACCC programs, tools, articles, and a curated hub of supportive care resources to help.

1Institute of Medicine. Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century. 2001.
2Institute of Medicine. Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis. 2013.
3Institute of Medicine. Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs. 2008.
4American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer. Cancer Program Standards: Ensuring Patient-Centered Care. 2016.  

Featured Programs

Shared Decision-Making

Shared Decision-Making: Practical Implementation for the Oncology Team seeks to highlight effective strategies in patient-provider communication, particularly through shared decision-making in relation to specific patient populations, such as those with metastatic disease, low literacy, and advanced old age, in which principles for effective communication differ vastly.
Learn More

Supportive Care Resources Hub

The Supportive Care Resources Hub offers a host of curated resources for providers in the areas of psychosocial distress screening, survivorship care planning, patient navigation, palliative care, and communication. 
Learn More

ACCCBuzz Blog Posts

From Oncology Issues

  •  Maintaining Patient Connections with Online Support Groups
    Elizabeth Bornstein, MSSA, LCSW, OSW-C, APSH-C
    Part of the hardship of COVID-19 is that the imperative to stay well by sheltering in place eliminates the option for group gatherings and other much-needed sources of peer support. As with many other groups and organizations, some cancer programs and practices have reached out to their patients virtually to provide the encouragement they once enjoyed in face-to-face support groups.
  •  A Rural Healthcare System Expands Cancer Care with a “Hub and Spoke” Model
    Kathleen Laraia, MS, and Kendra G. Worden, MSN, FNP-C, AOCNP
    When an area is medically under-resourced, it can have a negative effect on care coordination, leading to delays in advanced imaging, diagnostic procedures, and surgical interventions. Advanced practice providers (APPs)—which our system defines as both nurse practitioners and physician assistants—can help improve access to quality care in the rural setting.
  •  Empowering Cancer Patients Using Integrative Medicine: A Novel Model for Breast Cancer Risk Modification
    Christina M. Bowen, MD; Robin Hearne, MS, RN; Caroline Dixon; and Charles H. Shelton, MD
    As a CoC-accredited critical access hospital—one of only about a dozen nationwide—The Outter Banks Hospital has developed a quality program with a focus on removing rurally linked barriers to care.
  •  Improving Cancer Care by Addressing Food Insecurity
    Tracey F. Weisberg, MD
    Our results indicated that food insecure patients tended to complete fewer months of treatment than their food secure counterparts. Food insecure patients who refused assistance had the lowest number of months of completed treatment; most food insecure patients who received assistance completed more of their treatment.
  •  Cancer Life reiMagined: The CaLM Model of Whole-Person Cancer Care
    Rebekkah M. Schear, et al.
    Co-designing a model with patients, survivors, and the community.