Explore our ACCC 2020 Impact Report, the Oncology Issues, Vol.36 N.5, and our video podcast, CANCER BUZZ TV.
 

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Distress Screening

In 2008, the Institute of Medicine (now the National Academies of Science, Medicine, and Engineering) released its influential  report, Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs, which called attention to the importance of the psychosocial needs of cancer patients and the consequences of these needs remaining unmet. The IOM report concludes:

Attending to psychosocial needs should be an integral part of quality cancer care. All components of the health care system that are involved in cancer care should explicitly incorporate attention to psychosocial needs.

Today, there is an increasing body of knowledge around this area, and organizations like the Commission on Cancer (CoC) and others are including distress screening as part of their guidelines and accreditation standards.

Featured Program

Psychosocial Distress Screening—Model Sites

ACCC, along with its project partner APOS, identified three ACCC member programs that are serving as model sites for the “Psychosocial Distress Screening” project.
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FROM THE ACCCBUZZ BLOG

From Oncology Issues

  •  A Cognitive Approach to Cancer Treatment
    Marlena Ryba, PhD
    Too often, the emotional burdens accompanying cancer lead to early withdrawal from chemotherapy, for example, and poor outcomes. However, a series of clinical studies suggest psychotherapy can counter those effects, with powerful implications for patients.
  •  Building a Navigation and Psychosocial Support Program from the Ground Up
    Lori McNulty, RN, and Faye Flemming, RN, BSN, OCN
    At ACCC member Southside Regional Medical Center, an oncology nurse navigator heads up navigation and psychosocial services, including partnering with a local community agency to help meet high referral and patient demand.