Explore our ACCC 2020 Impact Report, the Oncology Issues, Vol.36, N.3, and our video podcast, CANCER BUZZ TV.
 

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Distress Screening

In 2008, the Institute of Medicine (now the National Academies of Science, Medicine, and Engineering) released its influential  report, Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs, which called attention to the importance of the psychosocial needs of cancer patients and the consequences of these needs remaining unmet. The IOM report concludes:

Attending to psychosocial needs should be an integral part of quality cancer care. All components of the health care system that are involved in cancer care should explicitly incorporate attention to psychosocial needs.

Today, there is an increasing body of knowledge around this area, and organizations like the Commission on Cancer (CoC) and others are including distress screening as part of their guidelines and accreditation standards.

Featured Program

Psychosocial Distress Screening—Model Sites

ACCC, along with its project partner APOS, identified three ACCC member programs that are serving as model sites for the “Psychosocial Distress Screening” project.
Learn More

ACCCBuzz Blog Posts

From Oncology Issues

  •  Implementing a Transportation Hub: A Holistic Approach to a Systemic Problem
    Rachel Marquez, BS, MPH
    Patients with cancer who face transportation barriers often find themselves at a crossroads: They must either continue to piece together various forms of assistance to try to complete a treatment regimen and protocol or throw in the towel altogether. Instead of reacting to patients’ needs after they fall out of compliance with their specified treatment, we pledged to proactively offer and find transportation assistance that meets all patient needs.
  •  A Nurse Navigator Led Community-Based Cardio-Oncology Clinic
    Rachel Zirkelback, BA, et al.
    Dr. Vijay Rao and Dr. Eric Stephen Rubenstein returned from a Global Cardio-Oncology Society meeting g with the realization that they could do much more to protect patients with cancer from potential cardiac toxicity of chemotherapy. The two shared one goal: to prevent the cancer survivor of today from becoming the heart failure patient of tomorrow.
  •  Trending Now in Cancer Care
    Alexandria Howson, PhD
    Rather than fielding its annual Trending Now in Cancer Care survey while cancer programs were experiencing unprecedented challenges due to the extended public health emergency, ACCC chose to facilitate conversations with its members to capture the lived experiences of the most pertinent issues impacting oncology practice and care delivery.
  •  Compliance: Behavior Health Assessment and Intervention for Oncology Patients
  •  A 3D Lung Nodule Tool Improves Patient Distress Following LDCT
    Theresa Roelke, MSN, RN, AGNP-C
    To improve the care of these patients, MaineHealth, Maine Cancer Care Network designed a study to explore the use of a 3D lung nodule tool to help providers educate patients during shared decision-making consults.
  •  Expanding Patient Access to Cancer Care Services
    Kelley D. Simpson, MBA; Stacy Melvin, MHA; and Sue Fletcher, RN
    Key results from a national survey show a range of new initiatives.
  •  Telehealth at Its Best: Transitioning a Comprehensive Psychosocial Program to a Virtual Format
    Jennifer Bires, MSW, LCSW, OSW-C, and Drucilla Brethwaite, MSW, LCSW
    Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and its associated risks for patients with cancer, all Life with Cancer programming was cancelled on Mar. 12, 2020. Staff, struggling with their own anxiety over personal safety, quickly went into action on how best to continue to meet the psychological and educational needs of patients and families.
  •  Improving Cancer Care by Addressing Food Insecurity
    Tracey F. Weisberg, MD
    Our results indicated that food insecure patients tended to complete fewer months of treatment than their food secure counterparts. Food insecure patients who refused assistance had the lowest number of months of completed treatment; most food insecure patients who received assistance completed more of their treatment.
  •  Cancer Life reiMagined: The CaLM Model of Whole-Person Cancer Care
    Rebekkah M. Schear, et al.
    Co-designing a model with patients, survivors, and the community.
  •  Young Adult Parents Tap into Long Distance Support
    Laura Melton, PhD, ABPP
    We proposed creating an online video support group to enable patients with cancer who would otherwise have difficulty attending such groups to participate virtually.