Explore our ACCC 2020 Impact Report, the Oncology Issues, Vol.36, N.4, and our video podcast, CANCER BUZZ TV.
 

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Conference Partners

ACCC-TxSCO-275x65
The ACCC 38th National Oncology Conference is a collaboration between the Association of Community Cancer Centers and the Texas Society of Clinical Oncology.

 

Agenda

The ACCC 38th National Oncology Conference (ACCCNOC) will bring you actionable "how-to insights" on program operations and patient care—LIVE in Austin! The agenda is developed through the guidance of the expert ACCCNOC Advisory Board & Task Force. Check back here for real-time updates.

innovator-seal-2021-plural-30x30Denotes 2021 ACCC Innovator Winner

 

3:00 – 6:00 PM
Onsite Conference Registration Open

1:00 – 5:00 PM
Community Service: Central Texas Food Bank

6:00 – 7:00 PM
Opening Reception in the Exhibit Hall
Celebrate the official opening of the conference by reconnecting with old colleagues, meeting new friends, and enjoying regional cuisine and libations in the Exhibit Hall!



7:00 – 8:00 AM
Breakfast with Exhibitors

8:00 – 8:15 AM
Welcome & Opening Remarks

8:15 – 9:00 AM
Deconstructing the Value Equation
Harlan Levine, MD President, Strategy and Business Ventures City of Hope

Cancer care is a complex—and often controversial—topic, with multiple stakeholders that view “value” through many different lenses. Hear what value in cancer care means to patients and their caregivers and how this meaning is usually different for payers and employers. Then consider how we define value in oncology reflects on us as a society. Strategize how these different perspectives fit together to yield a value equation that takes into account outcomes, patient experience, cost, and time…and yet it is not enough. Each stakeholder brings their own perspective to the relative value of these variables, resulting in solutions that address some issues while creating new ones. Hear about the role you can play in defining oncology value going forward, and in so doing, help drive to a better—and more equitable—cancer care delivery system.

9:15 – 9:45 AM
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Implementing a Transportation Hub: A Holistic Approach to a Systemic Problem
Rachel Marquez, MPH, Director of Transportation Services, Cone Health Cancer Center

After data showed that individuals living in two ZIP codes had a 12% and 15% no-show rate, compared to the average of 2.9% across all ZIP codes, this cancer program implemented a screening tool to initiate transportation discussions with patients before “non-compliance” with treatment became an issue. A pilot program addressed identified patient needs using an online transportation platform. Overall no-show appointments decreased by 48% and no-show incidence from patients living in the two at-risk ZIP codes dropped to 1.2% and 1.3%, respectively.

A Proactive Virtual Resource Center Navigation Model Identifies Risk Factors to Decrease Barriers to Cancer Care
Sharon M. Bigelow, RN, MSN, ANP, OCN, Nurse Navigator, Patient and Family Resource Center, North Carolina Cancer Hospital

Prior to COVID-19, the North Carolina Cancer Hospital Patient and Family Resource Center operated as a “retail” model of patient navigation, relying on others, including provider referrals, to help connect patients with resources and interventions to reduce or eliminate clinical and non-clinical barriers to care. When patients were no longer coming to the hospital and to limit exposure, the resource center adopted an outreach navigation model to proactively meet patients at their home. Nine risk factors helped staff identify those that may be vulnerable. To meet the needs of these at-risk patients, referral pathways were developed for providers and staff. Today, a team of nurse navigators triage patients and work with a Spanish liaison and a highly trained volunteer navigator workforce to connect with patients and families, provide barrier assessments, and offer emotional support. Vetted scripting was adopted, and ongoing training is provided. Approaching its first full year, this navigation model identified more than 975 at-risk patients and meaningfully engaged with more than 950 patient families, resulting in over 1,500 documented interventions to reduce barriers to care. Additionally, the model is improving our knowledge of how risk factors and risk stratification can help explain drivers of resource utilization and patient outcomes. After receiving the Quality and Safety Award from the UNC Health Care System, hospital leadership acknowledged the value of this model, and adoption has been extended throughout all UNC affiliates.

9:45 – 10:15 AM
Practical Application of Geriatric Assessment: Considerations for Your Largest Patient Demographic
Speaker(s) TBA

Because older adults make up the majority of new cancer diagnoses, most cancer programs, and practices treat a high percentage of this patient population, and yet many do not have a formalized approach to address the unique physiological and psychosocial needs that come with aging. Learn practical strategies to identify and assess these needs in your patients, as well as how to mitigate risks discovered by these assessments. Hear about a multidisciplinary plan that can be implemented in settings without abundant resources and return to your cancer program or practice with a framework to improve care delivery for older adults with cancer.

10:15 – 10:45 AM
Networking Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:45 – 11:15 AM
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An APP-Physician Model Improves Risk Stratification and Palliative Care
Jia Conway, DNP, CRNP, AOCNP, Nurse Practitioner, Cancer Care Associates of York

With the understanding that patient education about palliative care is an important component of oncology care, this practice implemented an advanced practice provider-physician model to provide this education. Risk-stratification assessment tools establish baseline metrics related to deficits in the areas of nutrition, psychosocial health, performance, and mental status changes, skin breakdown, fall risks, incontinence risk, and treatment tolerance, as well as existing co-morbidities. Providers then use these outcome measurements to make patient-specific, safe treatment decisions about chemotherapy, immunotherapy, surgery, and/or radiation.

A Multidisciplinary Team Improves Care Coordination of Patients with Pre- and Post-Treatment Visits
Carrie Wines RN, BSN, ONN-CG, Survivorship Program Coordinator, Charleston Area Medical Center

The Comprehensive Assistance to Resources and Education (CARE) Team meets with patients pre- and post-treatment. During the pre-treatment clinic visit, patients receive an initial assessment and educational session; are screened for any potential financial toxicities and/or psychosocial issues that may delay or hinder the patient’s treatment plan, and complete an advanced medical directive. A mid-level provider also reviews the treatment plan for accuracy and performs a physical assessment. At the post-treatment visit, patients are educated about long-term and late effects of treatment, monitoring for disease recurrence, and screening for new cancers. Survivorship care plans are prepared by the nurse navigator and reviewed by the mid-level for accuracy. Since implementing the treatment clinic, delays in scheduling chemotherapy and immunotherapy infusions have decreased by 15%. Pre-treatment visits have helped to identify and resolve potential delays, such as incomplete labs, scans, port placement, or cardiology and dental clearance.

11:20 – 11:50 AM
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Developing a Cancer Care and Community Paramedicine Partnership
Michele Goodman, RN, BSN, MBA, Vice President, Cancer Service Line
Scott A. Kasper, MS, Vice President & Chief, Albuquerque Ambulance Service
Presbyterian Healthcare Services

To reduce ED utilization and exposure to infectious disease, this pilot program identified symptoms that could be appropriately managed in a lower level of care setting—a patient’s home. A mobile integrated health team provided clinical interventions and wellness checks, such as hydration and labs, from the safety of patients’ homes. Throughout 2020, the care team made 652 home visits to 169 patients with cancer.

How to Evaluate the Impact of Cancer Programs and Clinical Services
Rebekkah Schear, MIA, Associate Director, Patient Experience; Co-Founder, Imagination Lab for Clinical Innovation
Robin Richardson, MA, Assistant Director of Care Delivery Transformation & Community Engagement; Co-Founder, Imagination Lab for Clinical Innovation
LIVESTRONG Cancer Institutes

How do I know if my cancer program is improving patient outcomes and quality of life? How can we assess if new models of care are working? Join us for this session and learn about the robust impact, quality, and evaluation strategy Livestrong Cancer Institutes developed to measure its new model of person-centered cancer care. During this interactive discussion, presenters share the nuts and bolts of their evaluation, including a PRO strategy for measuring patient experiences (PREMs); how to measure clinical outcomes, access to care, and care coordination; and how to measure cancer care provider experience and attitudes. Then do a deep dive into how their team built and deployed a massive chart abstraction to assess utilization of supportive care services by patients; development and deployment of a patient experience survey; how to design a study for qualitative data collection from patients; and how to develop and field a provider experience survey to evaluate whether the provider team is happy, if their work is meaningful, and measure their level of resilience.

11:55 AM – 12:25 PM
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Oncology Capture of ED Patients with Incidental Radiologic Findings
Nicholas Garland, MS, Senior Project Manager
Katharine Klar, RN, BSN, Assistant Nurse Manager
Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center

Increased use of CT scans in emergency departments leads to higher rates of incidental radiologic findings, including adrenal masses and pulmonary lung nodules. In this “pull” model for follow-up care, ED providers use the EHR to prompt oncology nurse navigators and case managers to contact patients with incidental findings. Prompt follow-up allows for earlier diagnosis and treatment—improving care and the patient experience. From a business perspective, the cancer program realized financial gains through additional visits, procedures, surgeries, radiology scans, and/or labs.

Implementing a Virtual End-of-Life Psychotherapy Group
Savannah Geske, PhD, Clinical Psychologist
Kadie Harry, PhD, Psychologist
Saint Luke's Health System

This session describes the utilization of a workbook and the development of a companion group therapy manual on end-of-life (EoL) planning for patients with advanced cancer. Any patient with advanced cancer is eligible for the free virtual psychotherapy group. During four weekly sessions, patients discuss and complete the workbook and compile information and documents about pre- and post-death decisions. Each session begins with a brief check-in and review of completed homework, as well as discussion questions pertaining to each group session’s content. Sessions also include recommendations and strategies on how to approach conversations about EoL decisions and concerns with loved ones and treatment providers. Hear preliminary results about an associated research project examining the effectiveness of this telehealth psychotherapy group to increase patient engagement in EoL planning, improve quality of life, decrease death-related anxiety, and help patients process fears and concerns.

12:25 – 1:15 PM
Luncheon Keynote: Cancer Care’s Road to Recovery from the Global Pandemic
Debra Patt, MD, PhD, MBA, FASCO, Executive Vice President, Public Policy and Strategic Initiatives, Texas Oncology

In the United States, annual preventative and medical appointments were disrupted for at least six months in 2020, and efforts to ramp up cancer screening efforts are slower than expected. The decline in cancer screening rates, physician E&M visits, and administration of anti-cancer therapies will likely result in more patients presenting with advanced stages of cancer and possibly higher cancer mortality. Learn strategies to spread awareness of these issues to key stakeholders in your community, including patients, family members, and caregivers. Hear about outreach efforts like “Time to Screen” a partnership between the Community Oncology Alliance and CancerCare. Understand the key steps to help your cancer program or practice recover from the global pandemic.

1:15 – 1:45 PM
Desert Reception in Exhibit Hall

1:30 – 4:30 PM
Workshops
Four interactive workshops—held on Thursday and Friday—provide how-to strategies and resources to bring back to your cancer program, self-care activities to empower and re-energize, and the opportunity to make connections with peers in small-group discussions.

  • Making the Business Case for Comprehensive Cancer Care Services
  • Focus on self-care with activities like art therapy,  mindfulness,  and yoga.  Then participate in robust discussions on how to make a  business case for adding these and other patient-centered services at your cancer program or practice.
  • Understanding Implicit Bias in Cancer Care
  • Conversations will explore ways to understand your own—and others—implicit bias and how cancer care team members can make tangible improvements in health equity.  Gain the skills necessary to treat—and communicate—with your colleagues,  patients,  and caregivers in a more equitable manner. 
  • Finding Joy and Improving Self-Care
  • Group exercises,  education,  and training will help you re-engage yourself and your colleagues who may be exhausted and burned out from the effects of the past year. Learn strategies to improve self-care and joy in the work that you do. 
  • Building Sustainable Coalitions in Your Community
  • Learn how to build sustainable relationships and coalitions with community organizations, which will lay the foundation for understanding how these partnerships support successful cancer outreach,  prevention,  and screening efforts and help improve population-based health.

5:30 – 7:30 PM
Dine Around Networking Event



7:00 – 8:00 AM
Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall

8:00 – 9:00 AM
ACCC Annual Award Presentations

9:15 – 9:45 AM
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The DISCO App: A Patient-Focused Tool to Reduce Financial Toxicity
Lauren M. Hamel, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Oncology
Lorna Mabunda, Clinical Research Assistant, Behavioral & Field Research Core
Wayne State University School of Medicine; Karmanos Cancer Institute

The DISCO (DIScussions of COst) app educates patients with cancer about potential treatment-related costs and generates tailored questions to prompt cost-related conversations with providers. In a pilot study, the app significantly improved patients’ self-efficacy for managing treatment costs and interacting with providers while decreasing cost-related distress. Most importantly, 100% of these video-recorded clinic visits included a cost discussion on topics ranging from patient co-pays to transportation concerns.

A Comprehensive Oncology Program for Elders (COPE)
Ponnandai S. Somasundar, MD, MPH, FACS, Vice Chairman of Surgery; Associate Chief, Division of Surgical Oncology; Director of Geriatric Oncology Program; Associate Professor of Surgery, Department of Surgery
M. Erkan Ceyhan, PhD, Director, Center for Quality & Outcomes for Surgery & Oncology
Roger Williams Medical Center

The COPE program enrolls and manages geriatric patients who have been diagnosed with cancer and engages their family members and caregivers. Patients are assessed at time of diagnosis, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 180-days after the initial diagnosis. The program takes a holistic care approach by utilizing tools and assessments, such as: 1) delirium risk, 2) cognitive assessment, 3) difficulty swallowing, 4) depression screening, 5) patient-reported quality of life measurement, 6) malnutrition assessment, 7) palliative care screening, 8) impaired functional status, 9) impaired mobility, and 10) timed up and go (TUG) test. A multidisciplinary team reviews the results of these assessments. When a risk factor is identified, care intervention is coordinated by a nurse navigator. Research faculty use patient data to develop risk stratification approaches that predict outcomes based on longitudinal assessments, labs, prospective treatment modalities, and comorbidities. A user-friendly Microsoft Excel based-tool monitors patient information including enrollment, compliance, status of assessments and interventions, referrals, and risk scores.

9:45 – 10:15 AM
Educational Session TBA

10:15 – 10:45 AM
Networking Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:45 – 11:15 AM
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3D Virtual Reality: Changing the Standard of Care for Patients with Cancer and Their Caregivers
Douglas Holt, MD, Chief Resident, Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Cancer Center, UCHealth-Oncology Services

Virtual reality (VR) is uniquely positioned to improve patient understanding of cancer and its treatments. During clinical consultations, radiation oncology personnel use a mobile VR cart to provide 3D patient-specific CT, MRI, and PET-CT imaging to enhance provider and patient interaction, improve patient education, and reduce patient distress. Hear results from a clinical study that captured both quantitative and qualitative data on patient acceptance and the perceived usefulness of VR in cancer education and treatment.

A Model Telehealth Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology Program
Amanda Parkes, MD, Assistant Professor, Division of Hematology, Medical Oncology and Palliative Care; Associate Program Director, Hematology and Medical Oncology Fellowship, University of Wisconsin-Madison

In this telehealth consultative model—the first of its kind in the country—adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients aged 15-39 years at time of referral are offered a telehealth visit with a dedicated physician. This one-time telehealth clinic visit serves as an AYA-focused individualized needs assessment in which five key areas are addressed: psychosocial and supportive care, fertility, genetic predisposition, clinical trial consideration, and survivorship care. Multidisciplinary insight is then provided through an AYA interdisciplinary team meeting following the telehealth clinic visit. Learn how offering these services through telehealth consult decreased the resources needed to start the program (e.g., clinic space), expand the reach of the AYA program, and reduced barriers to access.

11:20 – 11:50 AM
innovator-seal-2021-plural-30x30
Remote Monitoring of Patients with Cancer During COVID-19
Nancy Bowle, MHA, RN, OCN, CRNI, NEA-BC, CPC, CHONC, Vice President, Nursing
Inova Schar Cancer Institute

This cancer program piloted a remote monitoring program for clinically stable COVID-19 positive patients with cancer. Using equipment provided to them by the cancer program, patients reported vital measurements three times daily. Data was collected on a password-protected patient dashboard and monitored 12 hours a day, 7 days a week by advanced practice providers. APPs and physicians worked in tandem to make clinical determinations on appropriate next steps, documenting provider communications and clinical recommendations in the EHR.

Benefits of an Early Mobility Program for Hospitalized Patients with Cancer
Cardinale B. Smith, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Chief Quality Officer, Cancer Services, Mount Sinai Health System, Division of Hematology/Medical Oncology, and Brookdale Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine

This inpatient oncology unit used Activity Measure for Post-Acute Care scores to quantify mobility and then develop team-based, multidisciplinary plans of care in collaboration with physical therapy, nursing, and a mobility aide—a medical assistant with rehabilitation training. Patients were mobilized twice per day, seven days per week. Staff evaluated the effects of the mobility aide program on quality of care and healthcare utilization and observed significant improvement in both. Outcomes across nearly 1,000 patients include: a 6% reduction in excess days; a reduction of readmission rates from 25% to 19%; three-quarters of patients (76%) maintained or improved their mobility score; and improved patient satisfaction—patient willingness to recommend the hospital increased from 63% to 91%.

11:55 AM – 12:25 PM
Improving Shared Decision-Making Across a Multi-Site Cancer Program
Candice Roth, MSN, RN, CENP, Assistant Vice President –Operations, Nursing & Quality
Melynda Ozan, MLIS, Health Librarian
Levine Cancer Institute

Levine Cancer Institute successfully developed tools and methods to encourage shared decision-making across its network of more than 25 regional sites. Learn how this cancer institute built a standardized treatment platform (Electronically Accessible Pathways, or EAPathways), so all clinicians are using the same evidence-based guidelines, treatment updates, and clinical trials. This ensures that patients across more than 25 clinic locations receive the most consistent, high-quality care possible. Then, in 2017, Levine Cancer Institute hired a consumer health librarian to create a digital library of patient education handouts, including links to approved cancer information websites, which are available to all clinicians and staff through a Microsoft SharePoint site. This health librarian reviews all patient-facing information—including marketing brochures, new visitor policies, and patient education—to ensure materials are written at an appropriate reading level. The health librarian also sits on the Patient and Family Advisory Council, which is often involved in the development of patient resources and chairs the Oncology Patient Education Committee. To further improve shared decision making, Levine Cancer Institute uses a care alignment tool (CAT) to document clinician-patient discussions about goals of care in the patient’s chart for use in advanced care planning. The CAT includes questions that help identify patients' fears or concerns for the future, important goals, and preferences related to using sustaining measures at the end of life.

Effective Practices for Treating Patients with CLL During the COVID-19 Era and Beyond
Speaker(s) TBA

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic deeply affected the treatment patterns for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Hear what providers may face when seeing patients with CLL whose disease may have been poorly monitored due to COVID-19 restrictions. Discuss effective practices for treating patients with CLL during the pandemic—including best options and timing for treatment and any changes to the usual treatment regimen. Explore what care may look like for patients with CLL now and beyond the pandemic and learn strategies to prepare for the future and improve the care of this patient population.

12:25 – 1:30 PM
Networking Lunch with Exhibitors

1:30 – 4:30 PM
Workshops
Four interactive workshops—held on Thursday and Friday—provide how-to strategies and resources to bring back to your cancer program, self-care activities to empower and re-energize, and the opportunity to make connections with peers in small-group discussions.

  • Making the Business Case for Comprehensive Cancer Care Services
  • Focus on self-care with activities like art therapy,  mindfulness,  and yoga.  Then participate in robust discussions on how to make a  business case for adding these and other patient-centered services at your cancer program or practice.
  • Understanding Implicit Bias in Cancer Care
  • Conversations will explore ways to understand your own—and others—implicit bias and how cancer care team members can make tangible improvements in health equity.  Gain the skills necessary to treat—and communicate—with your colleagues,  patients,  and caregivers in a more equitable manner. 
  • Finding Joy and Improving Self-Care
  • Group exercises,  education,  and training will help you re-engage yourself and your colleagues who may be exhausted and burned out from the effects of the past year. Learn strategies to improve self-care and joy in the work that you do. 
  • Building Sustainable Coalitions in Your Community
  • Learn how to build sustainable relationships and coalitions with community organizations, which will lay the foundation for understanding how these partnerships support successful cancer outreach,  prevention,  and screening efforts and help improve population-based health.

1:30 – 4:30 PM
Offsite Activity



 

Agenda subject to change.