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The COVID-19 pandemic has created a necessity for the incorporation of remote home monitoring for cancer patients, in order to maintain the health of both the patient and the health care workers who aid them.
Before the COVID-19 pandemic, patients with cancer received care in three settings: hospital inpatient, hospital emergency room, and the outpatient clinic. But just as the pandemic overturned deep-rooted barriers to telehealth uptake, it also brought renewed attention to the hospital-at-home model.
The COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative impact in the rate of cancer screening across various states in the United States. Louisiana, Delaware, Kentucky and Northern Michigan serve as vehicles for an analysis of the disparity in cancer screening rates, before and after the pandemic.
The COVID-19 pandemic brought renewed attention to the concept of the home being a site of care. Looking to the future, certain strategies can be implemented for cancer programs aiming to offer care to patients in their homes.
The COVID-19 pandemic posed many new complications for cancer programs and practices across the United States. To keep COVID-19-positive patients with cancer out of the hospital where they could potentially infect others, Inova Schar Cancer Institute in Fairfax, Va., implemented remote patient monitoring technology to continually track patients’ vitals while they are at home and in between their outpatient …
The COVID-19 pandemic had a significant impact on the cancer screening rate. While telemedicine has facilitated care delivery, there is a need for programs aimed at promoting screening. This understanding prompted Mercy Medical Center-Cedar Rapids, Hall-Perrine Cancer Center in Iowa to launch a initiative that has excelled in increasing their colorectal screening rates, and facilitated the provision …
Learn how genetic healthcare services have adapted to virtual care delivery, and what challenges face its widespread use after the COVID-19 pandemic is over.
On this episode of CANCER BUZZ, we discuss how healthcare providers and policymakers can work together to pave the future of telehealth beyond the current public health emergency.
This cancer program continues to meet patients’ psychosocial needs through enduring telehealth expansion, livestream groups and classes, and on-demand digital repositories.
12 accc-cancer.org | Vol. 37, No. 5, 2022 | OI C oastal Cancer Center is a private oncology practice with four locations across South Carolina’s Grand Strand, bordering the Atlantic Ocean. Established in 1982, Coastal Cancer Center has been a pillar in its community for decades. In 2010, it was the first practice in the state to become Quality Oncology Practice Initiative certified. The …
Physician shortages and growing healthcare costs threaten the sustainability of the in-person care model, but telemedicine and remote monitoring can be solutions for delivering equitable cancer care and improving access to quality care.
Rather than fielding its annual Trending Now in Cancer Care survey while cancer programs were experiencing unprecedented challenges due to the extended public health emergency, ACCC chose to facilitate conversations with its members to capture the lived experiences of the most pertinent issues impacting oncology practice and care delivery.
Amid the implementation of technological solutions such as remote patient monitoring in cancer care, it is important that all patients with cancer—regardless of race, ethnicity, and socio-economic status—benefit equitably.
An interview with Kathi Mooney, PhD, RN, FAAN, about the Huntsman at Home model, including the development and implementation of Symptom Care at Home.
When testing the feasibility of at-home treatment for patients with cancer, the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Care Center found that administrative restrictions like insurance approval were the greatest barrier to implementing an at-home visit.
Highlights from the ACCC 49th Annual Meeting and Cancer Center Business Summit.
Learn how Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center in Nashville, Tenn. has been using monitoring devices for patients undergoing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. Thanks to this technology, these high-risk patients can be remotely monitored 24/7.
Highlands Oncology Group took key steps toward implementing an ePRO platform aimed at reducing emergency department utilization and unplanned hospitalization, while improving the patient’s quality of life.
This is the story of how a large independent practice in northwest Arkansas has nurtured its research program over several decades and is now able to offer patients access to phase I, II, and III trials close to home and their families.
Ochsner Health, Ochsner Cancer Institute developed a program to remotely monitor patients on intravenous or oral anti-cancer treatment.