Tag Archives: reimbursement

2018 Quality Payment Program Rule Highlights

By Blair Burnett, ACCC Policy Analyst

On Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services released the 2018 final rule for the second year of the Medicare Access & CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) Quality Payment Program (QPP). While we were disappointed by some policies in the 2018 rule, in general, the final rule signals a continued commitment to increased flexibility and reduced administrative burden for clinicians.

Starting in 2019, Medicare-participating clinicians will have to choose whether they will participate in the new QPP through one of two tracks: the fee-for-service based Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) or through an Advanced Alternative Payment Model (APM). Clinicians should be reporting measures now (in 2017) for payment adjustments that will occur in 2019. If you are not aware of your obligations under the QPP, be sure to familiarize yourself as soon as possible – most clinicians should be reporting on three MIPS categories (quality measures, advancing care information, and clinical practice improvement activities) now for changes that are coming in 2019.

The final rule that outlines the QPP program in 2018 significantly reduces the number of providers subject to scoring under the MIPS track of the QPP. In 2018, any clinician with less than $90,000 in Medicare Part B allowed charges or fewer than 200 Part B beneficiaries will be exempt from MIPS reporting (previously this “low-volume threshold” was $30,000 in Part B charges and 100 Part B patients). With these changes, it is estimated that 123,000 providers will be excluded from MIPS scoring. CMS is also expanding access to reporting under the Advanced Alternative Payment Model (APM) track of the QPP. Clinicians who are participating in the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) Track 1+ as well as the Next Generation ACO Model and the Comprehensive Primary Care Plus (CPC+) program will all now qualify for QPP reporting as an advanced APM. CMS estimates that about 185,000 to 250,000 clinicians will now be eligible for reporting under an advanced APM, creating more competition within the MIPS track. CMS also expanded the option of reporting as virtual groups for physicians in groups of 10 or fewer and added bonus opportunities for small practices and clinicians treating complex patients.

CMS also eases reporting requirements around electronic health record (EHR) use, allowing MIPS-eligible physicians to be able to use 2014 or 2015 editions of certified EHR technology to meet the Advancing Care Information (ACI) category. Additionally, clinicians across the U.S. who were significantly affected by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and/or Maria are eligible to apply for an ACI hardship exception. These affected clinicians are eligible to apply for reweighting of the MIPS reporting requirements for quality, cost, and improvement activities categories for the 2018 performance period. The deadline to apply for both exemptions is December 31, 2017.

Despite these flexibilities, ACCC is disappointed to see that CMS has moved up the timeline to hold clinicians accountable for the cost of care they provide. Originally CMS had proposed that the cost category under MIPS be weighted at zero in 2018, however the final rule requires that cost account for 10% of the MIPS score in 2018. Additionally, despite opposition from ACCC and many stakeholders, CMS also finalized that Part B drug revenue will be subject to the MIPS adjustment, which is not what we believe Congress intended and breaks from past precedent in CMS policies.

We expect QPP participation and requirements will continue to evolve in the coming years, but be sure to prepare yourself now – these changes to Medicare reimbursement are around the corner.

ACCC members are invited to join us for a webinar on Wednesday, December 6, 2017, from 3-4 PM EST, for an in-depth analysis of the CY 2018 QPP final rule and how these changes may impact providers and their cancer program or practice. Learn more and register (log in required).

CMS Finalizes CY2018 OPPS & PFS Rules

By Blair Burnett, ACCC Policy Analyst

Bipartisan healthcare talks may have stalled in Congress as tax reform takes center stage, but the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) finalized the CY 2018 Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment Systems (OPPS) and Physician Fee Schedule (PFS) rules last week, bringing big changes to Medicare reimbursement in 2018. For highlights, read on.

2018 OUTPATIENT PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM HIGHLIGHTS
Overall, in 2018, CMS will increase OPPS payment rates by 1.35 percent.

340B – Most notably, the 2018 OPPS rule finalized substantial cuts to Part B drug reimbursement for 340B hospitals. Starting January 1, 2018, 340B entities will be paid Average Sales Price (ASP) minus 22.5 percent, instead of ASP plus 6 percent, for separately payable drugs that were acquired under the 340B Program, excluding drugs on pass-through status and vaccines. Most 340B entities are included in this reduction; however, for 2018 there are exemptions for rural sole community hospitals (SCHs), PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, and children’s hospitals. In the final rule, the agency reserves the right to revisit these exemptions in 2019. Drugs not purchased under the 340B Drug Pricing Program will continue to be paid at ASP plus 6 percent.

Early estimates suggest that this cut will produce $1.6 billion in savings which will be redistributed through a 3.2 percent increase in payment for non-drug items and services across all hospitals.

Operationally, CMS will also require the use of a modifier to identify whether a drug was purchased under the 340B Drug Pricing Program. One modifier will be required for hospitals that are subject to the payment reduction and another modifier for hospitals who are exempt from the payment reduction but still acquire drugs under the 340B Program.

ACCC and many other stakeholder groups advocated strongly against this proposal and hoped for a more constructive policy conversation about real reforms to the 340B program. Several hospital groups, including the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), and America’s Essential Hospitals, are considering a lawsuit to stop CMS from finalizing these reductions.

Drug Packaging – Under the prospective payment system, CMS has continually put forward policies that move OPPS toward bundled payments. In 2015, CMS conditionally packaged payment for ancillary services assigned to an APC group with a geographic mean cost of $100 or less, but excluded low-cost drug administration services. In 2018, CMS is finalizing its policy to conditionally package payment for low-cost drug administration services.

In 2018, CMS also extends non-enforcement of direct supervision requirements for outpatient therapeutic services for Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs) and rural hospitals with 100 or fewer beds in 2018 and 2019. Additionally, the agency is making changes to the date-of-service policy (i.e., the “14-day rule”) so that, in general, labs can bill Medicare directly for advanced diagnostic laboratory tests (ADLTs) and molecular pathology tests.

2018 MEDICARE PHYSICIAN FEE SCHEDULE HIGHLIGHTS
Overall, in 2018, CMS will increase physician payment rates by 0.41% with no combined impact on hematology/oncology and an estimated 1% increase for radiation oncology and radiation therapy centers.

Payment Rates for Non-excepted Off-campus Provider-Based Hospital Departments – CMS is finalizing a reduction to payment rates for services provided at non-excepted off-campus hospital outpatient provider-based departments (i.e., off-campus facilities that began billing under OPPS after Nov. 2, 2015). Payment rates for services provided at these facilities will change from 50 percent of the OPPS rate to 40 percent of the OPPS rate. The agency states that this payment decrease is meant to “level the playing field” between hospitals and physician practices by promoting “greater payment alignment.”

Biosimilars – In a reversal of agency policy, CMS also finalizes a policy that each biosimilar product will receive its own unique reimbursement code. This is a departure from a policy in the CY 2017 OPPS Final Rule requiring that biosimilar products that rely on a common reference product be grouped into the same payment calculation for determining a single ASP payment limit.

Telehealth Services Expansion – In the 2018 PFS, CMS significantly expands telehealth services, adding numerous codes to the telehealth services list – including new codes for visits to determine low dose computed tomography eligibility, interactive complexity, health-risk assessments, care planning for chronic care management, and psychotherapy for crisis. To reduce the administrative burden for providers, CMS is also finalizes a proposal that will not require reporting a telehealth modifier on future telehealth claims.

Additionally, CMS finalizes that practitioners will be required to begin reporting consultation of appropriate use criteria (AUCs) beginning in 2020.

ACCC members are invited to join us for a webinar on Wednesday, November 29, 2017 from 3-4 PM EST, for an in-depth analysis of how these final 2018 payment rules may impact your cancer program or practice. Learn more and register.

CMS Part B Drug Demo Unlikely to Move Ahead

By Leah Ralph, Director of Health Policy, ACCC

Centers_for_Medicare_and_Medicaid_Services_logoJust before Thanksgiving, top Senate Democrats asked the White House not to issue a final rule on the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) proposed Part B Drug Payment Model – a national program that would significantly reduce reimbursement for Part B drugs. This was  a good sign for our efforts against the proposal, and on November 21, we passed an important deadline for CMMI to release a final rule. We are now within a 60-day window of the new Administration taking office, which, if a final rule were to be released, due to a series of administrative rules in Congress, makes it much easier for the new Administration to simply pull back the rule rather than having to do it legislatively.

Simply put: we passed a critical deadline, and we’re very optimistic that we will not see a final rule on the Medicare Part B Drug demonstration for the remainder of the current Administration. ACCC spoke out strongly against this ill-conceived proposal. Hundreds of ACCC members weighed in with their members of Congress, and ACCC produced financial analysis that we shared with the committees of jurisdiction in both the Senate and House of Representatives that showed precisely how devastating cuts to Part B drug reimbursement under this proposed model would be on both practices and hospitals. ACCC thanks you for your efforts to block this poorly-conceived experiment. This is a victory for cancer patients and providers across the country who can now continue to provide high-quality cancer care close to home.

With a new year and a new Administration upon us, we will continue to face both opportunities and challenges in the oncology policy landscape. ACCC is committed to preserving the cancer delivery infrastructure, and we will continue to work with policymakers to develop thoughtful policies around value-based care and an appropriate, sustainable reimbursement system for all settings of care.

CMS 2017 OPPS & MPFS Final Rules: Top-Level Takeaways

By Leah Ralph, Director of Health Policy, ACCC

Centers_for_Medicare_and_Medicaid_Services_logoThis week the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released the final CY 2017 Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) and Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS) rules. ACCC is currently analyzing the rules and will hold a webinar for members with more in-depth information in the coming weeks. Below are some key highlights.

Outpatient Prospective Payment Systems CY 2017 Final Rule

CMS estimates that the policies in the final rule will increase OPPS payments by 1.7% in 2017. The big news: in the final rule, the agency goes forward with the site-neutral payment provision for new off-campus provider based departments (PBDs):

  • Newly built or acquired off-campus PBDs: CMS finalized its proposal to no longer allow new off-campus PBDs (that were not billing under OPPS as of November 2, 2015) to bill under OPPS beginning January 1, 2017. CMS is finalizing the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS) as the applicable payment system, but is also establishing new MPFS rates specifically so that hospitals can be paid directly for these new (what CMS is calling “non-excepted”) items and services. Hospitals will be paid under the MPFS at these new rates, which will be billed on the institutional claim and must be billed with a new claim line modifier “PN” to indicate that an item or service is non-excepted. For 2017, the payment rate for these new services will generally be 50% of the OPPS rate (with some exceptions, including payment for separately payable drugs, which will not be reduced). Packaging and certain other OPPS policies will continue to apply. Important: CMS specifically notes that items and services provided at new off-campus PBDs will continue to be reported on the hospital cost report and therefore eligible for 340B drug discounts if the parent hospital is a 340B eligible hospital. Find discussion of the impact of this policy on 340B discounts on pages 648-649 of the final rule.
  • Existing off-campus PBDs: CMS largely backed off its proposal to limit the expansion of outpatient items and services that can be billed under OPPS for existing off-campus provider-based facilities. PBDs that were billing under OPPS prior to November 2, 2015, can continue to bill for those services under OPPS—and expand those services beyond the 19 clinical families CMS had originally defined in the proposed rule. However, CMS has said that these facilities must remain at the same physical address to continue to bill under OPPS unless it is an extraordinary circumstance, such as a natural disaster. This may be short lived though as CMS also indicated it will continue to look at this and that the agency is “interested in what data…could be collected that would allow us to implement a limitation on service expansion” for these exempted facilities.
  • Packaging Policies:
    • CMS is finalizing its proposal to create 25 additional C-APCs, which are primarily major surgery APCs within the various existing C-APC clinical families.
    • The agency is finalizing its proposal to base packaging on a claim, rather than on date of service, so that services that are provided during a hospital stay that spans more than one day are packaged.
    • CMS finalized the expansion of a policy that excludes molecular pathology tests from CMS’ laboratory packaging policy to other Advanced Diagnostic Laboratory Tests (ADLTs).

Physician Fee Schedule CY 2017 Final Rule

The CY 2017 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule final rule focuses on policies aimed at improving pay for primary care, chronic care management, mental health care, and diabetes prevention. The rule’s provisions are expected to have a neutral impact on hematology/oncology, radiation oncology, and radiation therapy centers, and a -1% impact on radiology. Select cancer-related provisions include:

  • Payment for Mammography Services: CMS finalized a new coding framework based on new CPT coding for mammography services. The coding revision reflects use of current technology used in furnishing these services, including a transition from film to digital imaging equipment and elimination of separate coding for computer-aided detection services. CMS is maintaining current valuation for the technical component of mammography services in order to implement coding and payment changes over several years.
  • Medicare Telehealth Services: CMS finalized the addition of several codes to the list of services eligible to be furnished via telehealth, including: advance care planning services, end-stage renal disease related services for dialysis, and critical care consultations furnished via telehealth using new Medicare G-codes. CMS is also finalizing payment policies related to the use of a new place of service code specifically designed to report services furnished via telehealth.
  • Appropriate Use Criteria for Advanced Imaging Services: The Protecting Access to Medicare Act (PAMA) of 2014 established a new program to promote the use of appropriate use criteria (AUC) for advanced diagnostic imaging services under fee-for-service Medicare. As a component of the Medicare AUC program, CMS finalized the first eight priority clinical areas, which include cancer of the lung (primary or metastatic, suspected or diagnosed). CMS also finalized the clinical decision support mechanism (CDSM) application to allow for preliminary or full qualification; the deadline for the first round of applications is March 1, 2017.

View fact sheets for both rules here: OPPS and PFS.

 

Key Takeaways from Congressional Hearing on “Medicare Drug Experiment”

By Brittney Fairman, Policy Analyst, ACCC

Capitol BuildingOn Tuesday, May 17, the U.S. House Energy and Commerce Committee Subcommittee on Health held a hearing titled “The Obama Administration’s Medicare Drug Experiment: The Patient and Doctor Perspective,” which focused on CMS’ proposed Medicare Part B Drug Payment Model. The Subcommittee heard from witnesses representing the provider and patient communities, including:

  • Debra Patt, MD, MPH, MBA, Vice President of Texas Oncology and Medical Director of The US Oncology Network;
  • Marcia Boyle, President and Founder of the Immune Deficiency Foundation;
  • Michael Schweitz, MD, FACP, MACR, National Advocacy Chair of the Coalition of State Rheumatology Organizations;
  • Heather Block, a patient advocate; and
  • Joe Baker, President of the Medicare Rights Center.

Notably, the hearing echoed many of the concerns ACCC and fellow stakeholders have been voicing since CMS released the proposal in early March. Key takeaways include:

CMS is operating under a false premise that there are always less costly therapeutic equivalents available to treat patients. In the case of oncology, treatment situations where there are true clinical substitutes are “few and far between,” Dr. Patt pointed out. When a therapeutically equivalent drug does exist, those drugs are not always available to every clinician nor are they always most conducive to a patient’s specific treatment plan.

The proposed demonstration will create barriers to patient access and have a disproportionate impact on rural areas. With a lack of appropriate safeguards, healthcare providers fear the demonstration program would create additional financial pressures that would push rural or small physician practices out of business.  For patients in rural areas – or patients that require more expensive therapies – this may cause difficulty in accessing oncology care.

CMS’ proposal is akin to an involuntary clinical trial. Witnesses and Committee members pointed out that CMS’ experiment is not unlike a clinical trial, requiring participation of providers and their patients for the purposes of data collection. However, unlike a clinical trial, participation is involuntary and the proposal lacks critical patient safeguards – patients may never know if their provider is operating under a control or experimental arm of CMS’ demonstration. This randomized trial will, unknowingly and unwillingly, limit patient access to needed care.

Average Sales Price (ASP), by definition, is an average. Many community oncologists – often smaller practices – are not able to gain price advantages and are currently paying well above ASP for Part B drugs. Any further reductions to reimbursement will make it impossible for providers to cover the acquisition cost of many, if not most, cancer treatments.

Witnesses also addressed a series of “carve-outs” that have been discussed by policymakers, including for oncology providers, the Oncology Care Model (OCM) participating practices, or rural providers. Dr. Patt, however, pointed out that “there’s no right way to do the wrong thing.” Most witnesses called for a full withdraw of CMS’ proposal.

These points and more can be found in ACCC’s comments, submitted to CMS in early May. ACCC is continuing to monitor Congressional efforts on the CMS proposal.

ACCC Voices Part B Demo Concerns on Capitol Hill & at CMS

By Amanda Patton, ACCC, Communications

ACCC-PartB-Demo-Meeting-Capitol Hill-crop2With the Medicare Part B Drug Payment Model comment deadline fast approaching (Monday, May 9 at 5:00 pm EDT), ACCC continued its push to educate policymakers on the detrimental impact this ill-conceived proposal will have on community cancer care, providers, and patients.

This morning ACCC President Jennie R. Crews, MD, MMM, FACP;  ACCC Past President Ernest Anderson Jr., MS, RPh, FASHP; and Leah Ralph, Director of Health Policy, ACCC; together with representatives from the Hematology/Oncology Pharmacy Association (HOPA) and the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS), traveled to Capitol Hill to meet with Senate Finance Committee staff and discuss concerns about the Part B proposal’s impact on cancer care. During the meeting, ACCC shared information from a data analysis that reveals the significant financial impact the proposal would have on providers and patients.

In a meeting with CMS Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) staff on Monday afternoon, ACCC leadership, along with representatives from HOPA, and ONS—reflected the voice of multidisciplinary cancer care providers.  ACCC shared results from the Part B proposal data analysis and reiterated ACCC’s strong concerns that are reflected in our comment letter to the agency.  Read our comment letter.

Stay tuned for advocacy updates from ACCC.

 

ACCC Supports H.R. 5122, Legislation to Prohibit Medicare Part B Drug Demo

By Leah Ralph, Director of Health Policy, ACCC

Capitol BuildingThe Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC) thanks Representative Larry Bucshon (R-IN) for introducing H.R. 5122, legislation to prohibit further action on the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) proposed rule for the Medicare Part B Drug Demo. ACCC urges prompt passage of H.R. 5122 in the U.S. House of Representatives.

ACCC remains strongly opposed to the Part B Drug Demo and is deeply concerned about the potential impact of this misguided proposal on both providers and the patients they serve.

Our membership, comprising approximately 2,000 practices and hospitals across the country, is committed to implementing value-based reforms and to continuing to work with CMS on meaningful payment reform—our members will be participating in the CMMI Oncology Care Model and investing in the infrastructure needed to comply with MACRA. However, CMS’ Part B Drug Model proposal is a nearsighted approach to Medicare reform.

ACCC supports H.R. 5122, and a full withdraw of the program, to provide the oncology community and CMS time to fully understand the impact of this policy and to work with CMS on meaningful reform.

For more on ACCC advocacy efforts on this issue, visit accc-cancer.org.

ACCC Asked: Congress Listened

By Leah Ralph, Director of Health Policy, ACCC

time for actionToday 242 members of Congress joined in a bipartisan letter to CMS Acting Administrator Andy Slavitt urging the agency to withdraw its proposed Medicare Part B Drug Payment Model.  The effort was spearheaded by House Ways and Means Committee Member and Budget Committee Chairman Tom Price, MD (R-GA), House Energy and Commerce Committee Member John Shimkus (R-IL), and House Ways and Means Committee Charles Boustany Jr., MD (R-LA).

You asked and Congress listened.  Last week, hundreds of ACCC members reached out to their legislators asking that they sign on to the Congressional letter to CMS.  ACCC thanks its membership from 2,000 cancer programs and practices across the country for speaking up and telling their legislators about the detrimental impact this proposed rule would have on their patients and providers.

But the question remains: Will CMS listen?

May 9 is the deadline for comments to CMS on this misguided proposal. ACCC will be submitting comments to the agency and urges its members to send comments as well.

Learn more about ACCC advocacy efforts on this issue here.

A Misguided Experiment?

By Leah Ralph, Director of Health Policy, ACCC

Centers_for_Medicare_and_Medicaid_Services_logoThe noise around drug costs seems to have gotten louder in recent months, with policymakers clamoring for controls on drug pricing, Congressional hearings calling on pharmaceutical executives to testify, and recommendations from the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC) focused on containing Medicare spending in the context of ever-increasing prescription drug costs.

In early March, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a proposal to implement a national demonstration program that would target provider reimbursement and fundamentally change the way Medicare pays physicians and hospitals for Part B drugs. The scope of what CMS is proposing is sweeping. If finalized, it represents a significant departure from the methodology and philosophy underlying Medicare’s current reimbursement system, leading to bigger questions about the most appropriate—and effective—way to curb drug spending.

Mandatory Participation

 CMS has broad authority under the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation (CMMI), created by the ACA, to test different models that would improve quality and lower costs in the Medicare program. However, the agency seems to be pushing the scope of its authority, breaking from past demonstration programs to propose a mandatory model in which all Part B providers–hospital outpatient departments, physician offices, and pharmacies–would be required to participate.

The proposed Part B Drug Payment Model would consist of two phases in which providers would be divided into four groups: three experimental groups and one control group over a five-year period. Phase I would be implemented as early as August 2016 and would mandate that approximately half of all Part B providers would have their reimbursement rates reduced to ASP+2.5% plus a flat fee of $16.80 per drug per day. Importantly, Congressionally-mandated sequestration will continue to apply to payments made under the model. As a result, under the proposal, the experimental group’s actual payment rate will be ASP+0.86% plus $16.53 per drug per day. The remaining half, the control group, would continue to be reimbursed for Part B drugs at ASP+6%. The goal, which policymakers have discussed for sometime, is to eliminate financial incentives for providers to prescribe more expensive drugs.

Ambitious Timeline

The agency’s ambitious timeline calls for Phase II to begin as early as January 2017. Phase II would further divide the control and test groups—creating a four-arm control trial—and overlay a requirement to use value-based pricing (VBP) reimbursement strategies and clinical decision support (CDS) tools to produce Medicare savings. One (unlucky) group of providers will be subject to both the reduced ASP rate and the requirement to utilize VBP tools. These tools might include:

  • Reference pricing: Medicare would set a standard payment for therapeutically similar products.
  • Indications-based pricing: Payment would vary for a drug based on its clinical effectiveness for different indications.
  • Voluntary-risk sharing agreements: CMS would enter into voluntary agreements with manufacturers to link health outcomes with payment.
  • Discounting or eliminating patient coinsurance to encourage beneficiary use of high-value drugs.

Unanswered Questions

Despite a preliminary list of potential tools, CMS failed to describe these VBP approaches in any meaningful detail, leaving many questions about how CMS will develop this methodology and how the agency will make determinations about high-value treatments.

Perhaps most unnerving, providers would be assigned to arms of the trial at random based on their geographic location in Primary Care Services Areas (PCSAs), which are clusters of ZIP codes that reflect primary care service delivery. Although CMS has structured Phase I to be budget-neutral for the Medicare program, among providers, there will be winners and losers: the program is designed to redistribute drug spending by increasing payments to provider specialties, such as primary care, that use relatively inexpensive drugs and decrease payments to hospitals and physician specialties, such as oncology and ophthalmology, that often use more costly drugs. Specifically, under the proposed model, the tipping point is $480–drugs that cost providers more than $480 per day on average would result in lower reimbursement, whereas products costing less than $480 per day would produce higher payments than what is reimbursed today.

The majority of drugs–7 of 10–that would make up the largest reduction in reimbursement are used to treat cancer. Moreover, many of these drugs do not have a lower cost alternative.1

ACCC Takes Action

 On both policy and process, ACCC remains deeply concerned. Rather than working with cancer care professionals to build the infrastructure needed to define quality and value in their cancer programs, CMS has responded to a call for reigning in drug costs with a myopic focus on reimbursement. Our members have partnered with CMS on meaningful payment reform – including the most recent Oncology Care Model – and will soon be dedicating extensive resources to navigating a new, and complex, reformed physician payment system under MACRA.

Oncologists are ready for change, but CMS’ proposal reaches too far, too fast, with seemingly little understanding of the devastating impact this approach will have on community cancer care and patient access.

Early on, ACCC joined with 60 oncology stakeholder groups in a letter to CMS asking the agency to withdraw its proposal. On March 17 ACCC, together with more than 300 state and national organizations, sent a letter to Congress asking policymakers not to move forward with the CMS Part B Drug Payment Model proposal. We recently partnered with the Hematology/Oncology Pharmacy Association (HOPA), the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS), and the Association of Oncology Social Work (AOSW) to caution Vice President Biden about how the proposal would impede the goals of the Administration’s cancer Moonshot initiative.

CMS will accept comments on the proposal until May 9, 2016. ACCC will be submitting a comment letter and urges members to express their concerns to the agency.

Access ACCC resources related to this issue and learn more about our advocacy efforts here.

_________________________________________

This post was updated on April 26, 2016.

ACCC Annual Meeting: Five Key Takeaways

by Amanda Patton, ACCC Communications

ACCC 42nd Annual MeetingNearly 500 oncology professionals gathered in Washington, D.C., last week for the 42nd ACCC Annual Meeting, CANCERSCAPE. Throughout sessions centered on policy, value, and quality, attendees heard a recurrent message: Your experience, perspective, and input on the issues of value-based care, quality measures, and outcomes are essential as the healthcare system and oncology transition to the new world of alternative payment models and value-based care.

From ACCC Capitol Hill Day last Wednesday throughout the meeting sessions, attendees were urged to educate policymakers and payers about the real-world processes involved in delivering quality cancer care.

In the meeting’s opening session, Congressman Rick Nolan (MN-D)  called out the vital role ACCC members can play in helping educate legislators and policymakers, “No one can articulate need, challenges, potential to ultimately cure cancer [better] than the people in this room today,” he said.

Can precision medicine be reconciled with value-based care? “Absolutely” said Kavita Patel, MD, MS, of the Brookings Institution.  Oncology already delivers personalized (or precision) medicine through targeted therapies for some cancers, she pointed out. Communicating about the oncology care process so that policymakers understand real-world cancer care delivery is imperative, Patel said. Part of that conversation should aim to help policymakers understand the demanding intuitive thought process that is part of today’s oncology care, along with the tremendous amount of information cancer care providers must keep up with given the pace and variety of emerging therapies. “It’s not writing prescriptions,” she said.

Five Key CANCERSCAPE Takeaways

High-level meeting takeaways that interconnect value, policy, and quality include:

  1. Alignment. For value and quality measures to work in oncology, alignment among payers, providers, and patients is essential.
  2. Put your data to work. Cancer programs and practices are finding ways to harness their data to improve quality patient-centered care and reduce costs. In a presentation on Collaboration Across Specialties to Improve Care and Curb Costs, Matthew Manning, MD,  from Cone Health demonstrated how his program used data to identify “hotspotters,” assess gaps in care, improve outcomes, and reduce costs.
  3. Communicate. Support conversations across silos and among stakeholders. Engage with patients to understand their goals of care and to define value and quality. While value frameworks are generic, “all patients are different” agreed panelists in a Town Hall discussion on Value Framework Tools.
  4. Be proactive. Don’t wait until USP Chapter 800 goes into effect to assess your facilities readiness. Don’t wait until HRSA issues its final 340B mega-regulation. Take steps today to assess your program’s compliance. “Be prepared” was also the message in a Biosimilars Update from Nisha Pherwani, PharmD, BCOP, clinical director of Oncology, Cardinal Health. She urged attendees to:
    • Understand the FDA approval process for biosimilars
    • Provide a concise review to your P&T committee
    • Review the FDA guidances on biosimilars
    • Stay tuned for more on how interchangeability will impact regulations.
  5. Speak up. Oncology providers can best articulate the care they provide and the issues impacting care delivery. Leadership in oncology has to step forward to help define quality and value and inform policy. Work with ACCC to make your voice heard.

This week’s CMS release of a proposed rule designed to test new Medicare Part B drug payment models makes clear the critical need for the oncology community stay on top of what is happening among policymakers in Washington, D.C.  ACCC has voiced strong opposition to CMS’s proposal. Among other concerns, ACCC points to the lack of opportunity for stakeholder input on the development of this proposal.

ACCC urges its members speak up and ask Congress to stop the CMS Medicare Part B Drug Payment Model.  Click here to contact your legislators.