Tag Archives: patient satisfaction

Go to Gemba? Here’s Why

By Cynthia Jones, BSHA, CPHQ

Quality

After nearly seven years as a quality leader in the outpatient oncology setting, I still remember my first days as a newcomer to ambulatory cancer care. I had many years of experience in large acute care hospitals, where quality roles are fairly well defined and quality priorities are well known: Risk, mortality, readmissions, cost, regulatory needs, and data-driven metrics are the norm.

However, one measurement is important in all care settings—patient perception.

Coming from an inpatient background, I was the new kid on the block. I needed to not only explain what I was doing there in the outpatient setting, but also engage cancer program staff so that they would lead the process of identifying quality priorities in their unique areas of cancer care.

One of the first requests in my new role came from the radiation oncology manager and team. They were struggling with patient perception survey results, which were below the organization’s goal. Nothing they did seemed to make a difference.

As a quality officer, I could see numerous areas of improvement; however, it was not my job to fix things, but rather let them discover the issues and gaps that were right in front of them every day.

It was time to go to gemba.

Walking the Walk
A Japanese word meaning “go to the place” or “place where work is done,” gemba is a Lean process that asks unbiased observers to see what is happening around them. Put simply, during a gemba walk, participants “go see, ask why, and show respect.” They walk through the processes of care, ask why things are being done that way, and respectfully take notes without confrontation.

I scheduled a one-hour gemba walk with the radiation oncology team.

My instructions were simple. I asked the team to split up and work in pairs, and then divided the pairs into two groups. Each pair was given a pen and a pad of paper. One group was asked to tour the cancer care facility as the health system VP, and the other as a patient newly diagnosed with cancer or their family member. This way your perspective shifts and you’re seeing facilities and workflow from a business, competition, and especially a patient perspective. Patients and their loved ones are not only absorbing life-changing information, they are also looking for the best place for treatment.

From their assigned perspectives, the radiation oncology staff observed their care environment. They sat in the waiting room, rode in a wheelchair, laid on a radiation table, waited in an exam room, and scanned the facility from ceiling to floor. They took notes, and then came back together an hour later to discuss their findings.

When the notes were compiled, they had around 100 observations. As they sat in chairs, they noticed the need for cleaning and maintenance. When they laid on the treatment tables, they noticed cords and cobwebs. They saw outdated magazines, overfilled trash cans, broken tiles in the bathroom, walls in need of repair, crooked pictures; as busy providers they walked by all of these things every day, but when asked to look as patients and leaders, the need for change became apparent.

We took these observations and turned them into data points that showed our highest areas of need, and we triaged action plans to address the identified issues. Staff learned how to request facility repairs and act on their observations instead of walking by. Their perspective changed. And so did their patient perception scores, improving over time to meet—and even exceed—their organization-wide goal.

The role of quality leader is not necessarily to fix things. Often, it is to help others see existing problems for themselves. Through gemba walks, management and staff can learn to by stepping outside of their daily routine and seeing their facility and their workflow with new perspective.


ACCC member Cynthia Jones, BSHA, CPHQ, is a Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality, Cancer Quality Program, REX Cancer Center, UNC REX Healthcare.

Learn more about strategies and solutions for improving the patient experience at the upcoming ACCC 34th National Oncology Conference, Oct. 18-20, 2017, in Nashville, TN.
View the agenda.

 

Getting Engaged

One in an occasional blog series on topics from Oncology Issues, the journal of the Association of Community Cancer Centers.

by Susan van der Sommen, MHA, CMPE, FACHE, ACCC Editorial Committee Chair

ThinkstockPhotos-484468581When first hearing of a cancer diagnosis, I imagine a patient’s mind spinning with a cyclone-like ferocity … Am I going to die? How will I tell my family? What about all of my plans? It’s cancer … of course I am going to die … but how soon? Suddenly, life spins out of control.

Engaging patients in their care can dramatically reduce anxiety by giving back some control. Of course they can’t control the diagnosis, but they can control how they face it – on their terms, with their beliefs, wishes, and desires at the forefront of every decision.

In a recent Oncology Issues article, “Talk to Me: Improve Patient Engagement; Improve Your Cancer Program,” author Chad Schaeffer, MS, FACHE, lays the foundation for developing strategies to connect patients and the decision-making process relating to their care. Improved patient engagement can alleviate some of patients’ burden in feeling as if they are hapless victims of heinous misfortune and allow them to regain some semblance of control over their future. Schaeffer is executive director at the Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center at Cabell Huntington Hospital, Huntington, WV.

Defining patient engagement in simple, broad terms as “the ongoing and mutually beneficial interaction between patient and providers,” he notes that putting the patients’ needs and aspirations first will improve engagement and, ultimately, satisfaction for all.

What are the goals?

Patients’ treatment goals vary and are individualistic. Some desire to extend life at any cost; others prefer quality over quantity. Many want as little disruption to their daily lives as possible. As Schaeffer points out, evening and weekend hours, though not always pleasing to cancer center staff and physicians, will allow some patients and caregivers the flexibility to carry on with their routine (work, childcare, etc.) while receiving treatment and care at a time that is convenient.

Are we meeting your needs?

Cancer center physicians often struggle with the difficult conversations regarding the “end of life,” resulting, as Schaeffer points out, in decisions that may not coincide with a patient’s wishes. According to an end-of-life study at Stanford University, family members whose loved one died in an “institutional setting” reported poor symptom management, lack of physician communication and patient engagement, and a dearth of emotional support for loved ones and caregivers. Conversely, those who passed with home hospice services reported a considerably higher degree of satisfaction with regard to unmet needs and physician engagement.

Is there something you aren’t telling me?

In addition to reviewing Press Ganey and CGCAHPS surveys, the leaders at the Bassett Cancer Institute in upstate New York have instituted a process where they can – in real time – monitor patient satisfaction. Throughout the course of their treatment, patients are offered a tablet on which they answer a few questions about their care. Questions are flagged so that when a patient expresses dissatisfaction, a member of the leadership team can address the patient’s concern during his or her visit. It gives both the patient and staff an opportunity to more effectively understand what drives patient satisfaction while giving patients an active voice in their care.

Engaging patients from the outset of their diagnosis and throughout their care is critical to their satisfaction and ultimately, as Schaeffer points out, a more effective, patient-centered cancer treatment center.

Patient–centered care is a key focus of the upcoming ACCC Annual Meeting, CANCERSCAPE, March 2-4, in Washington, D.C. Learn more here.

Read the current edition of Oncology Issues here.

ACCC member Susan van der Sommen, MHA, CMPE, FACHE, is Executive Director, DSRIP, Bassett Healthcare Network. She currently serves as chair of the ACCC Editorial Committee.