Tag Archives: improving the patient experience

Go to Gemba? Here’s Why

By Cynthia Jones, BSHA, CPHQ

Quality

After nearly seven years as a quality leader in the outpatient oncology setting, I still remember my first days as a newcomer to ambulatory cancer care. I had many years of experience in large acute care hospitals, where quality roles are fairly well defined and quality priorities are well known: Risk, mortality, readmissions, cost, regulatory needs, and data-driven metrics are the norm.

However, one measurement is important in all care settings—patient perception.

Coming from an inpatient background, I was the new kid on the block. I needed to not only explain what I was doing there in the outpatient setting, but also engage cancer program staff so that they would lead the process of identifying quality priorities in their unique areas of cancer care.

One of the first requests in my new role came from the radiation oncology manager and team. They were struggling with patient perception survey results, which were below the organization’s goal. Nothing they did seemed to make a difference.

As a quality officer, I could see numerous areas of improvement; however, it was not my job to fix things, but rather let them discover the issues and gaps that were right in front of them every day.

It was time to go to gemba.

Walking the Walk
A Japanese word meaning “go to the place” or “place where work is done,” gemba is a Lean process that asks unbiased observers to see what is happening around them. Put simply, during a gemba walk, participants “go see, ask why, and show respect.” They walk through the processes of care, ask why things are being done that way, and respectfully take notes without confrontation.

I scheduled a one-hour gemba walk with the radiation oncology team.

My instructions were simple. I asked the team to split up and work in pairs, and then divided the pairs into two groups. Each pair was given a pen and a pad of paper. One group was asked to tour the cancer care facility as the health system VP, and the other as a patient newly diagnosed with cancer or their family member. This way your perspective shifts and you’re seeing facilities and workflow from a business, competition, and especially a patient perspective. Patients and their loved ones are not only absorbing life-changing information, they are also looking for the best place for treatment.

From their assigned perspectives, the radiation oncology staff observed their care environment. They sat in the waiting room, rode in a wheelchair, laid on a radiation table, waited in an exam room, and scanned the facility from ceiling to floor. They took notes, and then came back together an hour later to discuss their findings.

When the notes were compiled, they had around 100 observations. As they sat in chairs, they noticed the need for cleaning and maintenance. When they laid on the treatment tables, they noticed cords and cobwebs. They saw outdated magazines, overfilled trash cans, broken tiles in the bathroom, walls in need of repair, crooked pictures; as busy providers they walked by all of these things every day, but when asked to look as patients and leaders, the need for change became apparent.

We took these observations and turned them into data points that showed our highest areas of need, and we triaged action plans to address the identified issues. Staff learned how to request facility repairs and act on their observations instead of walking by. Their perspective changed. And so did their patient perception scores, improving over time to meet—and even exceed—their organization-wide goal.

The role of quality leader is not necessarily to fix things. Often, it is to help others see existing problems for themselves. Through gemba walks, management and staff can learn to by stepping outside of their daily routine and seeing their facility and their workflow with new perspective.


ACCC member Cynthia Jones, BSHA, CPHQ, is a Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality, Cancer Quality Program, REX Cancer Center, UNC REX Healthcare.

Learn more about strategies and solutions for improving the patient experience at the upcoming ACCC 34th National Oncology Conference, Oct. 18-20, 2017, in Nashville, TN.
View the agenda.

 

Dietitian as Navigator: A Winning Combination

By Kelay Trentham, MS, RDN, CSO

Compass pointing at answers-SMALLIn cancer care, the use of patient navigators has grown substantially over the past decade. In 2012, the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer added Standard 3.1 requiring that accredited programs have a patient navigation process in place.

While the navigator’s role and responsibilities may vary from institution to institution, clinical navigators typically:

  • assess patients’ clinical, financial, spiritual, and other needs;
  • ensure patients are referred for appropriate supportive care services such as financial counselors, social workers or psychologists, palliative care, and rehab services;
  • provide needed patient education on their disease and its treatment;
  • assist patients in overcoming barriers to care; and
  • assist in discharge and advanced care planning.

Given this list, it may come as no surprise that nurses and social workers are often in navigator roles. Some programs may also employ non-clinical navigators who assist patients with some services, as is the case with the American Cancer Society’s resource navigators, who educate patients about ACS and other community resources. Patient navigation often involves a variety of multidisciplinary team members, with nurse or social work navigators referring patients to physical therapists or dietitians for their specialized care, for example.

For diagnoses that require intensive nutritional support, such as head and neck or esophageal cancer, a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) can effectively serve as a patient’s principal navigator, as these patients may see the RDN as often, if not more often, than other team members. In initial medical and radiation oncology consults, these patients are often told that they will need a feeding tube. For many patients, the idea of having or using a feeding tube can be frightening and overwhelming. Prior to receiving feeding tube education, patients may have many concerns such as that the tube is very large and cumbersome, how it might impede normal daily activities, that tube placement is permanent, or that they or their caregiver(s) won’t be able to learn how to use it. Meeting with an RDN for immediate education can allay any fears and concerns about this component of their care plan and reduce distress. In addition, the RDN can reassure patients and caregivers that he or she is available to assist with any questions about using the tube throughout the course of treatment. Further, the RDN navigator can assure the patient that their experience and training places them in a unique position to best advocate for the patient with respect to nutrition support issues.

The RDN’s knowledge base makes this member of the cancer care team an excellent fit for ensuring coordination of care with a patient’s home infusion agency. An RDN navigator can work with the medical team to ensure proper documentation so that enteral feedings are covered by insurance, assist patients with locating donated tube-feeding supplies and formula in the event of limited or a lack of coverage, and work with pharmacy services to get medications converted to crushable or liquid forms for use in feeding tubes. In addition, the RDN navigator would continue to see the patient regularly during the transition from tube feeding back to an oral diet, coordinating care with the speech therapist or surgeon as needed. For example, after esophagectomy, patients experience significant changes in oral diet tolerance and may require considerable education and coaching to adapt to their “new normal.”

Much like the nurse or social worker navigator, the RDN would refer patients to other disciplines when needed, such as to an RN for education about port placement, to a social worker or financial counselor for financial concerns, or to rehabilitation services (physical and/or lymphedema therapy). For some patients, intensive nutrition support may be required from before treatment until long after treatment is completed, making it a central component of care that an RDN is well equipped to navigate.

For cancer patients requiring intensive nutritional support, having an RDN serve as the patient’s navigator can be a winning combination, improving care and the patient experience.


ACCC member Kelay E. Trentham, MS, RDN, CSO, is a past chair of the Oncology Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. She is currently an oncology dietitian at MultiCare Regional Cancer Center in Tacoma, WA.

For more, learn about a weekly outpatient nutrition clinic for head and neck cancer patients developed by 2014 ACCC Innovator Award winner Beaumont Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, MI.

Creating a Navigation Intake Assessment Tool

By Tricia Strusowski, MS, RN

Compass pointing at answers-SMALL      “I want to be aware of the navigator and support services as soon as possible.”

This is a frequent response from patients when asked about the optimum point in the cancer care journey to learn about navigation and support services.

And yet, during a first visit (or intake interview) with a patient, navigators may question how much to review. Where is the balance between too much information and not enough?  Based on my experience in care coordination and patient navigation, here’s my perspective on creating and using an intake assessment tool.

Number 1 Rule:  Assess if the patient is ready for this discussion. First, provide support. Let the patient and his or her family take lead in the conversation. Listen. Then, based on your assessment, ask the patient and family if they are ready to review the support services and their specific needs. Once you receive their permission, you can then initiate the intake assessment process.

Each cancer program should have a consistent process for assessing and educating patients and families about the cancer program and support services.  A well-crafted intake assessment tool can be used for all cancer disease sites and should include the following:

  • Role of the navigator and the support staff at your cancer center
  • Mini assessment of immediate support service needs
  • Preferred learning style for education
  • Questions that prompt a conversation on what the patient knows about his or her cancer
  • Questions to elicit from the patient specific concerns, goals, and family concerns
  • Family, medical, and surgical history
  • Mini symptom and behavior risk assessment
  • A listing of national and community resources (usually included in patient’s treatment journal).

Gathering this essential information at the time of your initial visit with the patient will establish a strong foundation for the multidisciplinary team. The navigator’s assessment process is an opportunity to begin the discussion about goals of care and/or goals of their treatment—a pillar for providing patient and family-centered care. Further, identifying patients’ preferred learning style and using it across the continuum sets them up to succeed in understanding their cancer and treatment plan. This information can be shared at tumor conferences, multidisciplinary meetings, huddles, or via email if a secure environment is established.  It is also vital to support the navigator role in educating the patient and family consistently, as well as providing an important resource tool for navigators who may be called on to cover for a colleague. An assessment tool is a key component for a consistent foundation to navigation, but health literacy training and patient education teach-back methods can enhance the process and support staff success in educating patients and their families.

Assessing the immediate needs of the patient and family, while providing education and support, establishes a patient-centered approach and lays the groundwork for a strong bond between the patient, family, the navigator, and the support services.

View a sample navigation intake assessment tool. You are welcome to revise this tool as needed for your cancer program.


ACCC member Tricia Strusowski, MS, RN, is a consultant with Oncology Solutions, LLC.

The upcoming 34th ACCC National Oncology Conference, Oct. 18-20 in Nashville, Tenn., features multiple sessions focused on optimizing patient navigation services to improve the patient experience, and more. View the conference agenda.

Patient-Centered Cancer Care: Personal Pain Goals

By Susan van der Sommen, MHA, CMPE, FACHE

Stethescope with idea light

Pain relating to a cancer diagnosis is one of the most feared symptoms by patients. Pain is subjective and can be attributed to multiple factors: spiritual beliefs, physical pain, and psychological, or social issues. Additionally, pain is a common occurrence that can dramatically affect a patient’s quality of life during and after cancer treatment.

A 1993 study performed by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group  (ECOG) notes that 86% of practitioners felt their patients were under-medicated for adequate pain control and only 51% felt their practice controls patients’ pain effectively. Poor pain assessment, a practitioner’s reluctance to prescribe, and a patient’s unwillingness unwillingness to take the medication were reported as barriers.

More recently, in 2014 the Journal of Clinical Oncology published a landmark study by David Hui and Eduardo Bruera that discusses an evidence-based approach to personalized pain assessment and management that engages patients in identifying a personal “pain goal” they find acceptable.

As cancer programs and clinicians strive to improve upon the delivery of patient-centered oncology care, the need for continuing practitioner and patient education related to management of cancer-related pain is clear.

Education was one of the many factors considered by the team at Park Nicollet Oncology Research and Health Partners Institute in Minneapolis, Minnesota, when they instituted their quality improvement (QI) initiative in 2014 focused on pain control in their cancer patient population. Patient satisfaction and out-of-pocket costs for patients were other factors, as they realized that they weren’t meeting their patients’ goals with regard to their level of pain control and that the high cost of some pain medications was resulting in high out-of-pocket costs for patients. The ultimate goal of the Park Nicollet team was to improve their patients’ quality of life through improved pain control and minimizing side effects while curbing out-of-pocket costs.

One of the most innovative and patient-centered approaches Park Nicollet took in its QI initiative was documenting a patient’s personal pain goals. A study published in 2012 notes that the assessment is entirely feasible in a busy outpatient setting and that patients are fully capable of establishing their desired pain relief on a scale of 1-10. The team at Park Nicollet experienced the same results. They increased documentation of their patients’ personalized pain goals from 16% to 71% in one year. Today, approximately 85% of patients report that they have achieved their pain goal. Read the full story of their experience here.

Allowing patients to determine their comfort level – with the appropriate education, of course – is one more way cancer centers can put their patients at the center of their care and encourage genuine shared decision-making.


Contributing blogger Susan van der Sommen, MHA, CMPE, FACHE, is Executive Director, DSRIP, Bassett Healthcare Network, and Chair of the ACCC Editorial Committee.