Tag Archives: 2017 ACCC Innovator Award Winner

Reaching Out: Cancer Program-Community Collaborations for Health Equity

By ACCC Communications

No matter the cancer site or type of treatment, negative outcomes are disproportionately prevalent in underserved communities. For instance, a recent report finds that in the Appalachian Region, cancer mortality rates are 10 percent higher than the national rate, and the cancer mortality rate in that region is 15 percent higher in rural counties than in metro counties.1

To combat cancer disparities in North Carolina, Duke Cancer Institute decided to engage the community and create meaningful, collaborative relationships with local agencies, residents, and cancer care providers. The result was the Office of Health Equity and Disparities (OHED), which developed a five-step blueprint for cancer programs to engage their communities proactively, increase minority engagement, and improve the quality and scope of patient care. For their efforts, Duke Cancer Institute will be honored with a 2017 ACCC Innovator Award during the upcoming ACCC 34th National Oncology Conference in Nashville, Tenn.

ACCCBuzz talked with Nadine J. Barrett, PhD, MA, MS, the Director of OHED and one of the architects of the five-step roadmap, about the importance of community collaboration and vital measures any cancer program can take to address the prevalence of negative outcomes in minority communities.

ACCCBuzz: What is the importance of community collaboration in addressing health disparities and health equity in cancer care?

Nadine J. Barrett, PhD, MA, MS: The community plays a critical part in cancer care across the spectrum—from education and screening to survivorship. The relationships between the community and health systems are critical in terms of access to care and the barriers that may prohibit some from fully accessing services.  Collaborating and engaging with our community partners lets us find what innovative programs and services can be developed or enhanced to improve access to care within in the context of our cancer centers, no matter how small or large.

Typically , we come with this top-down approach with our community and patients, where what’s of value to them—their decision making, their thoughts, their ideas—wasn’t being captured. If we don’t create opportunities to learn from each other and work together toward a solution, then we’re fighting an uphill battle.

ACCCBuzz: So community collaboration is essential to delivering truly patient-centered care?

Dr. Barrett: Absolutely. Focusing on health equity and disparities also helps us to understand and appreciate the social and historical relationship that diverse populations have with their community cancer centers and health systems.  If a patient in the community doesn’t trust the health system or believe that the health system is only advocating on behalf of their own needs and interests, those perceptions will affect how they talk about cancer screening and diagnosis with their families, friends, and loved ones – ultimately impacting the perceptions and screening behaviors of their family, friends and the broader community.   Collaborating with trusted members and organizations with the community is critical to changing this narrative through authentic collaborations and communications.

ACCCBuzz: Why do you think community-based and academic cancer programs make a good partnership in addressing health disparities?

Dr. Barrett: We asked one of our community health centers what our partnership should look like. It was clear to us that there were resources and expertise they had with a given community, and there were resources and expertise we had with degrees of care. The closer we work together and align our priorities, the more we can leverage our expertise toward addressing the needs in their community.

For example, with the Commission on Cancer, when we do community health assessments, we can work together to understand a community’s cancer care needs and implement strategies and research to address them. Large academic centers are able to capture and analyze data. Why not leverage our respective strengths to capture that data? The second part of that is thinking about research, how we can engage our community and patients in research and clinical trials. These collaborations allow us to meet several needs simultaneously. We are able to identify and meet patient and community needs, organizational accreditation, and  institutional needs. A win-win for all.

Watch this video to learn more about the Duke OHED comprehensive program for community engagement.

ACCCBuzz: What can other cancer care programs take away from your work at Duke, in terms of improving health equity and disparity?

Dr. Barrett: With our comprehensive program, any and all parts can be modified to suit the size, needs, and capacity of community cancer program structures. For example:

  • Creating a community advisory council goes such a long way in addressing health disparities. Working together to identify needs, learn from each other, and gain insight into the challenges and opportunities to improve community health in cancer, and to make the appropriate linkages and support programs to address them. A partnership with a community advisory council can go miles in advancing health equity.
  • From there, you have to figure out how to conduct needs assessments in such a way that the patients, community, and organization’s needs are met, based on aligned priorities. You then can use  the assessment as a blueprint to address needs regardless of the size of the organization.
  • The third area is creating sustainable programs, services, and research opportunities that reflect the outcomes from the assessment findings.

All of these components need to be explored and modified based on the individual structure of local cancer programs.

ACCCBuzz: What are you excited to share with the attendees at the ACCC 34th National Oncology Conference this October?

Dr. Barrett: One of the things I’m most excited about sharing is how empowering this experience is. It’s so rewarding to know that the work we are doing is reaching such a diverse population—black, white, Latino, Asian, LGBTQ, Muslim, poor. There’s a generational difference now, too. We have young people advocating at the college level. It’s like we are in the midst of a community culture shift; we are building together across the spectrum of age, race, and ethnicity.etc. to advance health equity in cancer services.

Reference
1. Appalachian Regional Commission. Health Disparities in Appalachia. PDA, Inc., Cecil G. Sheps Center. August 2017. Available online here.


On August 15, 2017, Dr. Barrett was appointed to the Patient-Centered Outcome Research Institute (PCORI) Advisory Panel on Addressing Disparities.

Meet Dr. Barrett and hear more about the Duke Cancer Institute’s five-step process for implementing a health disparities and equity Health Disparities & Equity Program at the 34th ACCC National Oncology Conference in Nashville, Oct. 18-20.  Learn more.

 

Taking Lung Cancer Screening on the Road

Carolinas HealthCare System, Levine Cancer Institute will be honored with a 2017 Innovator Award at the ACCC 34th National Oncology Conference in Nashville, in October, for their development of the first mobile CT unit for lung cancer screening in the U.S., bringing state-of-the-art technology to rural communities. 

By Mellisa Wheeler, BSW, MHA, and Derek Raghavan, MD, PhD

As the oncology community is well aware, despite improvements to the early diagnosis, systemic immunotherapies, and gene-directed treatments of lung cancer, mortality rates remain high for this disease. A number of factors underlie this high death rate: the nature and natural history of the disease itself, poor access to care among continuing and recent smokers, lack of health education, fiscal and cultural issues, social stigma, and geographical isolation, among others. When patients present with Stage 1 (localized) lung cancer, surgical cure is possible in more than 50% of cases; when patients present with metastatic disease, for practical purposes, cure is highly unlikely.

Given that geographical isolation and barriers to care access are such important determinants of outcome, the Levine Cancer Institute sought to develop a program that would help to identify and eliminate barriers in high-risk and underserved communities.

Supported by a grant from the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation and in collaboration with Samsung and Frazerbilt, Levine Cancer Institute has developed the first mobile CT lung cancer screening unit in the United States.

Our mobile screening vehicle consists of a conventional low-dose Samsung CT unit mounted onto a robust, well-sprung truck body, with a built-in clinical space.  Initial testing has demonstrated the fidelity of the unit, as well as the lack of impact of on- and off-road transportation on the functionality and image quality of the scanner.

We have also created a mechanism for electronic image transfer for reporting at a central location by the staff of partner radiology groups like Charlotte Radiology, Stanly Imaging, and Shelby Radiological Associates. Watch our video and learn more.

The entire program, one of several lung cancer projects of different types supported by the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, is directed toward underserved and under-privileged populations. Our program includes several social components, including outreach and education on lung cancer screening for local physicians, nurse navigation and education, patient outreach with smoking cessation programs, and meticulous follow-up to avoid the loss of patients with identified lesions. Carolinas HealthCare System, the largest safety-net health organization in the Carolinas, has committed to providing optimal care to any patients shown to have lesions requiring further investigation, irrespective of their ability to pay; this care includes follow-up and repeat scanning; biopsy; and surgical, radiation, or systemic treatment.

We have already identified cases of early stage disease that have been directed towards definitive and hopefully curative treatment. In addition to the potential to improve patient outcomes, surgical treatment of early stage lung cancer is far less costly to the community than palliating the disease via systemic therapy. Through our program, we anticipate much improved outcomes for lung cancer treatment at a substantially reduced cost in the community.


Mellisa Wheeler, BSW, MHA, is Disparities & Outreach Manager, Levine Cancer Institute, and Derek Raghavan, MD, PhD, FACP, FRACP, is President, Levine Cancer Institute, Carolinas HealthCare System.

Hear details on the Levine Cancer Institute lung screening program and see their mobile CT unit at the ACCC 34th National Oncology Conference in Nashville, Oct. 18-20. Browse the full agenda.

 

Chemotherapy Drug-Specific Education: Putting Information at the Patient’s Fingertips

As we continue to better understand the many diseases encompassed under the name, “cancer,” we are also seeing an increase in the number and complexity of anti-cancer treatments. These exciting advances are taking place while cancer programs are striving to empower patients with education about their diagnosis and treatment journey and continually improve the patient experience of care. In this guest blog post, Dr. James Weese, vice president, Aurora Cancer Care, describes his program’s 2017 ACCC Innovator Award winning approach.

By James Weese, MD, FACS

The Challenge
Oncologists, nurses, and other cancer care staff across the country work tirelessly to find the best way to deliver a patient’s treatment plan, including the type of chemotherapy treatment recommended and side effects patients may experience. In the aftermath of hearing the words, “You have cancer,” the life-changing ripple effects of that diagnosis can make it challenging for patients and their families to absorb all the details and fully understanding the treatment plan that’s ahead.

At Aurora Cancer Care, we wondered how we could provide better information in a consistent manner to patients across our large geographical area. Information that could be delivered in the office and reviewed in the comfort of the patient’s home. We offer cancer care in 19 communities from the Wisconsin-Illinois border all the way up to Marinette, Wisconsin, and diagnose nearly 8,000 new cases each year.

That’s a lot of people who need to hear consistent messages and in a way that’s convenient for them.

Our team at Aurora Cancer Care set out to address this challenge while creating a more meaningful experience for patients and their families. Under the leadership of Kerry Twite, MSN, RN, a certified oncology clinical nurse specialist with Aurora Cancer Care, a series of more than 125 educational videos were developed to provide a more personalized experience to patients. Four key principles guided the development of the video series:

  1. All patients need basic information about chemotherapy prior to treatment.
  2. Most drugs today are given in combination with other drugs.
  3. Patients want to share educational information with family and friends who may not be able to attend each appointment.
  4. Patient education from nursing teams can vary depending on multiple factors, including available time, location, and number of other potential interruptions during the session.

The Video Solution
With these tenets in mind, our team developed more than 125 chemotherapy educational videos featuring Aurora Cancer Care physicians, nurses, and other staff. Each education video a patient receives includes three videos:

  • First, a chemotherapy video explains basic principles of chemotherapy, including how it is administered (oral or intravenous), the different types of drugs, and potential side effects and complications.
  • Then, a video provides specific information about each drug the patient will receive.
  • Finally, a “Cancer SOS” video, details for patients how to manage their care at home and when to call their physician or go to the emergency room.

All the educational videos are housed on a password-protected website. When patients receive their treatment plan, they are emailed a link and password to the specific drug treatment that they will be receiving. Patients can then watch the video before their next appointment in the comfort of their home, and they can also share the video with family and friends who may have questions. Patients can then come to their next appointment with specific follow-up questions. Patients and families can access and watch each video as many times as they wish.

Learn more on our education program in this video.

Results
Patients have shared with our nursing team how helpful they’ve found these videos in preparing themselves (and their families) for the road ahead. More engaged patients mean higher patient satisfaction scores, and we’ve certainly seen that too, though it’s very early in the roll-out of the video series to see a major shift.

Our video series has also allowed nursing staff to focus on other educational tasks during the patient’s appointment while still ensuring consistent educational information for patients is provided throughout the treatment process.

At Aurora Cancer Care, our focus rests solely on the delivering the best care possible to patients throughout our region and helping them fight and overcome the disease. We are honored to be named the recipient of a 2017 ACCC Innovator Award for our patient educational video series, and hope it might inspire other cancer centers to explore similar educational tools for patients.

Learn more about how we developed our video series during our presentation at the ACCC 34th National Oncology Conference, Oct. 18-20, in Nashville, TN.


James Weese, MD, FACS, is vice president, Aurora Cancer Care, Milwaukee, Wisc.

Meet all of the ACCC 2017 Innovator’s at the ACCC 34th National Oncology Conference in Nashville. Browse the full agenda. Early bird registration rates run through Monday, August 21.

Navigation Caseload Quandary?

Learn about 2017 ACCC Innovator Award winner USA Mitchell Cancer Institute’s homegrown Oncology Navigation Acuity Tool.

By Rev. Diane Baldwin, RN, OCN, CBCN, and Meredith Jones, MS, BSN, RN

FinalSealUnfortunately, nurse navigation services are typically non-revenue generating, necessitating a cost/benefit evaluation of these services for many programs. To justify nurse navigation in this new era of value-based care, we must define appropriate caseload volumes through risk stratification, and determine how best to allocate nurse navigation time and resources among those caseloads.

How Best to Measure & Define Acuity?
Acuity tools have been used in healthcare for decades and have proven successful as a means of determining staffing needs, improving patient care, and controlling costs.  Most acuity tools score patients on a scale of specific attributes. For nurse navigation programs, an acuity tool can be used to determine caseloads and aid in more efficient nurse navigator caseload management.

At USA Mitchell Cancer Institute, our nurse navigators, known as Clinical Care Coordinators, maintain a caseload of approximately 175 patients. However, as we identified more patients needing navigation services, we recognized the need for an acuity tool specifically for caseload management.

As we researched acuity tools, we found limited options related to oncology nurse navigation. Each of the tools we identified was specific to a facility, and was either used to determine overall staffing or focused specifically on the amount of time spent with patients.  We believed that a more generalized tool, including more patient factors, was needed to accurately determine patient acuity. Therefore, the USA Mitchell Cancer Institute began developing an Oncology Navigation Acuity Tool, universally designed to benefit our practice, while also allowing for use and adaptation by other cancer programs.

More Than Just a Number
USA Mitchell Cancer Institute’s goal was to develop a tool that measures a patient’s acuity through a holistic lens. As cancer care providers know, each patient’s navigation needs depend on a variety of factors. Our Oncology Navigation Acuity Tool considers 11 factors that we identified as directly correlating with patient resource utilization and, therefore, acuity level.  Each factor is reviewed individually to determine the acuity score, placing less emphasis on cancer type and stage, and more emphasis on overall patient context. For example, two patients with the same type and stage of cancer, receiving the same treatment, may present with different comorbidities and levels of family support, resulting in two very different acuity scores.

An inherit weakness in most acuity tools is that the “score” assigned to the patient determines overall acuity. However, we know that our patients are more than just a number.  Standardized tools often fail to identify important elements needed to address individual patient needs. Therefore, our Oncology Navigation Acuity Tool includes a 12th factor in determining a patient’s acuity: The clinical assessment of the nurse navigator.  This factor is essential to assessing the “whole patient” and our aim of providing holistic care.  Our nurse navigators use the 11 factors of Oncology Navigation Acuity Tool as a guide to assess the acuity of the patient and combine this with their overall clinical assessment, for a final acuity score.  Ultimately, our nurse navigators, may elect to change the acuity level based on their assessment of the individual patient.

Putting the Tool to Work
The Oncology Navigation Acuity Tool allows us to easily assess the needs of each navigated patient prior to caseload allocation and to quickly determine the level of navigation the patient will need. The tool has also guided managerial decisions to adjust caseloads based on acuity rather than patient count alone.  Further, we’ve utilized this tool for both quality and process improvement to study the varied needs of patients among the acuity levels, and to determine the effect of accurately navigated patients on system utilization and cost.

In our presentation at the ACCC 34th National Oncology Conference, October 18-20, in Nashville, TN, we’ll share more on how using this low-cost, simple to implement tool has resulted not only in a cost-effective, efficient means of refining navigation utilization, but also in the delivery of more personalized, comprehensive, improved quality of care for our navigated patients.

We look forward to seeing you in Nashville!


Rev. Diane Baldwin, RN, OCN, CBCN, is Manager, Quality Assurance, and Meredith Jones, MS, BSN, RN, is Director, Quality Management, at the USA Mitchell Cancer Institute.  

Desperately Seeking Oncology Nurses?

Stressed by nurse staffing shortages? Learn how 2017 ACCC Innovator Award winner Loma Linda University Cancer Center tackled this challenge.

By Lexine Thall, MN, RN-BC, AOCN, and Kristina Chase, BSN, RN, OCN

FinalSeal

One of the most challenging issues in healthcare is the ongoing balancing act of staffing and retention. For specialty areas, such as oncology, staffing presents an even more difficult challenge. Finding those perfectly qualified individuals with all the right experience to fill open positions can be a taxing, time-consuming task. As a result, cancer programs may find themselves dealing with lengthy vacancies, which can cause some real strains on a growing clinic and may led to an unhappy environment for nurses and patients. When our cancer program encountered this understaffing dilemma, chemotherapy skilled and oncology experienced (CS-OE) RNs in our cancer center began facing increased workloads, which put them at risk for potential burn out, being vulnerable to making errors, and causing longer wait times for patients.

Our cancer program leadership team had to think outside of the box and create a road map to alleviate some of these staffing strains. An analysis of appointment types and RN skill level needed for each visit type revealed that 40 percent of our supportive care therapies (e.g., hydration, blood transfusions) did not require a CS-OE RN. Given this information, we decided to pilot a program that would fill RN vacancies with experienced non-oncology nurses and create a pathway for these RNs to attain the ONS Chemotherapy/ONCC Chemotherapy Biotherapy Certificate. Our aim was to provide a mentorship program in conjunction with vetted education tools to develop these RNs professionally and alleviate our staffing crisis. The pilot program launched in 2014, and to date, 17 nurses have been accepted into the mentoring program. All RNs who opted to pursue the ONS/ONCC Chemotherapy Biotherapy Certificate (7 of 7) have attained their goal and 86 percent (6 of 7) of the RNs who attained this certification have remained with our organization.

Our mentorship program has drastically decreased the length of time we have unfilled RN positions posted—from an average of 113 days down to 29 days. It has also given many nurses an opportunity to gain focused experience in a specialty area for which many employers may not be willing to bear the educational costs. In addition to the benefit for the non-oncology nurse, the program has provided professional satisfaction and role expansion for the CS-OE RN mentors. A win-win for all parties involved.

At the ACCC 34th National Oncology Conference, October 18-20, 2017, in Nashville, TN, we’ll be sharing the details of our mentorship journey, “how to’s” for developing a program like ours, and some lessons we’ve learned along the way.  I hope you can join us in Nashville!

Hear more from all the 2017 ACCC Innovator Award winners at the ACCC 34th National Oncology Conference, Oct. 18-20, 2017, in Nashville, TN. Learn more.


Lexine Thall, MN, RN-BC, AOCN, is Director, Patient Care, Loma Linda University Cancer Center; Medical Oncology/Hematology; Women’s Cancer/Surgical Oncology; and Kristina Chase, BSN, RN, OCN, is Patient Care Supervisor.